Defund means abolish police!

first_img“Defund the police!” has leaped to the top of the demands that mass demonstrations have been making since the May 25 police murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. After that city’s 3rd Police Precinct building burned to the ground to the cheers of a majority of the U.S. population, there was no way for the U.S. rulers to ignore this demand. (tinyurl.com/y7lsqoh5)Something had to be done — and not just arresting and charging the killer cop and his accomplices with murder.The message rang clear: Take the bloated budgets away from police departments. Starve them for funds. Cut off the tanks and armored cars. End this repressive, racist force that uses lethal power.The openly racist president and his party attacked the “defund” slogan. His Democratic Party opponent Joe Biden was just as quick to say he would add funds for the police — for additional training in “sensitivity.”It was another reminder that both imperialist parties collaborate regarding the police. While they might argue over police procedures, both expect the police to continue their essential role. As Marxists, we know that this role is to stand above civilian society and impose the capitalist ruling class’s domination on all working people.In all class societies, the police forces originated from those mercenary elements that the rich — landowners, slave owners, capitalists — hired to “keep the poor in their place.”U.S. police evolved from those paid by the slavocracy to capture fugitive enslaved people. This origin has left its racist imprint on capitalist law enforcement.Police protect the capitalists’ ability to exploit — that is, to steal — the wealth produced by working people (which capitalists call profits) and concentrate it in the hands of a few. To the U.S. ruling class, police are the best servants.A debate has arisen over what “defund the police” means. Originally, it meant to eliminate police budgets or “abolish the police.”Some participants in the movement have argued for more limited demands, such as: stop the Pentagon from supplying the cops with heavy military hardware like tanks and helicopters; cut police budgets by 10 percent and use the funds to supply social services to the people; establish civilian boards that answer to the community to recruit, train and run the police.Workers World supports those forces in the movement that raise the slogan “Defund the police!” In the midst of an unprecedented uprising of the African-American community, one with broader support from the general population than ever before in U.S. history, any battle over specific demands merges with this living struggle and pushes it forward.The police and the racists will fight even the smallest reforms. A struggle to defund police must be won against not only the Trump forces but also against the Democratic Party establishment.As Marxists who see the police as a central component of the state, a state that imposes the rule of the capitalists on the workers, we from Workers World especially solidarize ourselves with those who extend the demand “Defund the police” to mean “Abolish the police!”Only by abolishing the racist, capitalist police — what Marx called “the bodies of armed men” that enforce class rule — and replacing them with popular organizations that answer to the working class and all oppressed sectors of the population — can the victories of today’s massive movement be made permanent.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

How the pandemic has affected the strategies of fighting hunger

first_imgTCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history printCrisis at the food banksSchool lunch changesSNAP & the National School Lunch ProgramHow the pandemic has affected the strategies of fighting hungerHunger in America: Part 1By Haeven GibbonsThis report was compiled using reporting done by students enrolled in JOUR 30204 035/065, fall semester 2020. Working in teams, students explored the issue of hunger in America through the Fault Lines of class, generation, geography, gender, sexual orientation and race. They focused on Tarrant County, Texas.  The classes included: Charles Baggarly, Leah Bolling, Molly Boyce, Haley Cabrera, Connor Cash, Brian Contreras, Cole DeLuca, Larry Flores, Kaitlyn Freetag, Caroline Garland, Andre Giammattei, Haeven Gibbons, Logan Gibbs, Kiana Giddings, Stephanie Joynt, Ben Kasper, Samantha Knapp, Molly Kuhl, Shaina Looker, Lucie Lundquist, Hailey Lyon, Derek Lytle, Cole Marchi, Morgan McBride, Angelica Menjivar, Raines Nagel, Tyresa Oluyide, Joey Palmeri, Collin Pittman, Colin Post, Braden Roux, Oscar Saravia, Matthew Sgroi, Asia Soliday, Branisha Spincer, Sophia Stellas, Charlotte Tomlinson, Sophia Vandewark.Americans have struggled to address hunger for nearly a century. Now, as COVID-19 runs rampant across the nation, upward of 54 million Americans are projected to face food insecurity. As the battle to end hunger nears its 100-year mark, the issue is further from being solved than ever before. “Before COVID we saw, since the great recession, a decline in hunger to 10.1%,” said Jeremy Everett, director of the Baylor Collaborative on Hunger and Poverty. “We were really moving in the right direction as a nation.” That growth, unfortunately, has been reversed by the COVID-19 pandemic.Hunger’s modern roots Hunger is a consistent policy issue at all levels of government. One of the first times that America took up the issue was during the The Great Depression era of the 1930s. “During the Depression there was so much hunger,” said Joel Berg, the CEO of Hunger Free America. “Before the Depression, there was no government hunger program whatsoever. No minimum wage programs whatsoever, and no school meals whatsoever.”Unemployment correlated with hunger in the 1930s as it does today. The rapidness of unemployment since March has contributed largely to the spike in hunger and poverty across the nation. “The people who were poor and hungry before, became poorer and hungrier,” said Berg. “And the people who were at the edge of poverty and hunger became poor and hungry.” Haeven G · Joel Berg on hunger since COVID-19The peak unemployment rate in 2019 was 3.7%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 35 million Americans were food insecure then, according to the USDA Household Food Insecurity in the United States Report. The peak unemployment rate in 2020 reached 15%, largely due to COVID-19. It is projected that 54 million Americans will have been food insecure in 2020.“Food insecurity commonly becomes a problem when people are laid off and have to make decisions on how they can spend their money- between paying utilities or feeding themselves and their families,” said Tarrant Area Food Bank Director of Marketing and Communications Michael Polydoroff.Crisis at the food banksThis rise in hunger levels caused the utilization of food banks to increase exponentially. The increased demand for their services also came as the COVID-19 pandemic surged across the country. The need to balance safety with a duty to help feed the hungry led to changes in how food banks operate. “The food banks had to rethink their entire workflow,” said JC Dwyer, who circulates organizational strategy and conducts civic engagement initiatives at Feeding Texas.Mainly, they had to make rapid changes to their traditional touch-based service model. The model involved food being passed through many hands before arriving to people in need, which became unfeasible during the pandemic. Food banks adapted to the changing circumstances by creating mass mobile distributions where food could be delivered directly to people’s car trunks.As they adapted to their new workflow, food banks also began to see different types of clientele that hadn’t usually utilized food banks before. “This year we started seeing a lot more people who, for the first time, had been thrown out of work,” Dwyer said. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)School lunch changesAs food banks changed their protocols, so did school lunch programs. Across the nation, schools locked their doors. For some students, this meant their main source of food was gone.Thirty million children depend on free or reduced-price meals from their schools for breakfast and lunch, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Out of those 30 million kids, only an estimated 15% are getting the meals they need since the COVID-19 pandemic forced schools to close.During a nine-week period between March and May, it was measured that over 1.15 billion meals were not being served due to school closures.The National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program are federally assisted programs run by the USDA to provide children with low-cost or even free lunches during the school day. The programs were established in 1946 after President Harry Truman signed the National School Lunch Act. In 1971, the USDA made an amendment to the National School Lunch Program to make the program more effective in feeding hungry students. Since then, about 95% of students eat lunch every school day. Eating on a consistent basis has shown a positive impact on student performance, behavior and attendance. Now, the pandemic has derailed the programs, pushing schools and administrators to innovate new ways to keep kids fed. New programs popped up throughout the spring and summer to get food to students who couldn’t attend school. The USDA’s Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer program transferred the value of meals students were missing and put them on debit cards or directly onto Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program debit cards. The P-EBT program kept roughly 2.5 million to 3.5 million kids out of hunger last spring, according to NPR. In Texas, families who were on SNAP before the pandemic did not need to apply for P-EBT. The deadline to apply for the 2020-2021 school year was extended to allow time for more families to receive the benefit, a sum of $285 per child in school who was or would be receiving free or reduced-price meals.Schools also had pick-up sites to allow no-contact meal services to children in the surrounding areas. In a survey of schools nationwide, it was found that 81% of schools were offering grab-and-go meals through pick-up sites, while 42% were delivering meals directly to student homes and 32% were using school bus routes to ensure students were fed.For the 2021 school year, the USDA waived previously required paperwork and allowed any student that wanted a meal to receive one. Schools are still compensated by the USDA, which is one of the ways they can afford to continue offering free or reduced-cost meals. Norma Ordonez places a tray of grilled cheese sandwiches into an oven to warm as she prepares take-away lunches for students kept out of class because of the coronavirus at Richard Castro Elementary School early Friday, Dec. 18, 2020, in west Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)In this Aug. 26, 2020, file photo, Los Angeles Unified School District students stand in a hallway socially distance during a lunch break at Boys & Girls Club of Hollywood in Los Angeles. California Gov. Gavin Newsom is encouraging schools to resume in-person education next year. He wants to start with the youngest students, and is promising $2 billion in state aid to promote coronavirus testing, increased ventilation of classrooms and personal protective equipment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)Norma Ordonez prepares take-away lunches for students kept out of class because of the coronavirus at Rihard Castro Elementary School early Friday, Dec. 18, 2020, in west Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)Santa Fe Public School food workers Dolores Rodella and Eva Dominguez distribute lunches and breakfasts at a bus stop during the coronavirus pandemic on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Around 70 meals were picked up by parents along a delivery route that extends into the county. Students in this school district are learning online only. A recent decision from the USDA has extended funding for free meals, regardless of a family’s income level. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio)Norma Ordonez places a tray of grilled cheese sandwiches into an oven to warm as she prepares take-away lunches for students kept out of class because of the coronavirus at Richard Castro Elementary School early Friday, Dec. 18, 2020, in west Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)In this Aug. 26, 2020, file photo, Los Angeles Unified School District students stand in a hallway socially distance during a lunch break at Boys & Girls Club of Hollywood in Los Angeles. California Gov. Gavin Newsom is encouraging schools to resume in-person education next year. He wants to start with the youngest students, and is promising $2 billion in state aid to promote coronavirus testing, increased ventilation of classrooms and personal protective equipment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)Norma Ordonez prepares take-away lunches for students kept out of class because of the coronavirus at Rihard Castro Elementary School early Friday, Dec. 18, 2020, in west Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)Santa Fe Public School food workers Dolores Rodella and Eva Dominguez distribute lunches and breakfasts at a bus stop during the coronavirus pandemic on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Around 70 meals were picked up by parents along a delivery route that extends into the county. Students in this school district are learning online only. A recent decision from the USDA has extended funding for free meals, regardless of a family’s income level. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio)Some districts provide meals for any student in the district as long as the school is area eligible. If there is a district where 50% or more of students are eligible to receive free meals, all the students will be served free or reduced lunch during the pandemic.In Tarrant County, there are 22 high schools with more than half of their students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch programs. The majority of these schools are located in the food desert areas of Tarrant County.Tarrant County has ­­­62 neighborhoods that the USDA deems areas with limited access to affordable and nutritious food and 11 zip codes that fall into the USDA’s definition of food deserts.USDA and FWISD fight HungerInfogramThe Tarrant Area Food Bank started an in-school pantry program last year as a way to combat hunger in Tarrant County.TAFB delivers 500-1000 pounds of food to designated Fort Worth Independent School District schools each month. The schools then distribute the food to families. “Different schools are set up different ways but they have, essentially, pantries within the school. They have closets or classrooms or under the desk pantries for their families,” said the TAFB Director of Agency Services Vicky Martinez.Additionally, FWISD had several distribution sites over the summer to provide access to free meals for students. There are over 25 sites located at elementary, middle and high schools.SNAP & the National School Lunch ProgramBefore the National School Lunch Program was established, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program was all families had to rely on to aid their hunger. When Franklin D. Roosevelt became the president in 1933, he began working on his New Deal to create government programs that would bring relief to the economic and hunger crisis that was the Great Depression. Roosevelt drafted the first form of SNAP, which is still the government program for hunger today. In 1939, the Food Stamp Program was the first government program that presented the idea of food stamps, creating the framework for how the U.S. would deal with a hunger crisis. While the programs laid a framework, Berg said that aid is still not easy to get for people who need it.“There are plenty of working people who make just too much, supposedly, to be able to get SNAP food stamps,” said Berg. “It is far harder for a low-income person to apply for SNAP than it is for many very wealthy people to pay their taxes. When you’re applying for SNAP you have to prove everything.”Haeven G · Access to federal programs like SNAPEven if someone qualifies for SNAP, the program does not take care of all his or her food needs. In 2020, the average SNAP benefit per person was $125 per month, which is about $1.39 per person per meal, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.In this Feb. 26, 2018, file photo, Carl Lewis in his market in Rankin, Pa. About half of Lewis’ customers pay with benefits from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)In this Feb. 26, 2018, file photo, Carl Lewis in his market in Rankin, Pa. About half of Lewis’ customers pay with benefits from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)Another part of Roosevelt’s New Deal was the Social Security Act. The SSA established a system that provided benefits such as unemployment insurance and aid for old-aged workers, dependent mothers and children, the blind and the physically handicapped.“The Social Security Act started by Roosevelt dramatically reduced senior hunger and poverty in America,” said Berg. By the end of the 1930s, the U.S. was phasing out of the Depression and into World War II. The war helped lift the county out of the Great Depression and “dramatically” reduced hunger and poverty in America by sparking economic growth. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program serves more than 4 million seniors, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Only 42 percent of eligible elderly individuals participate in SNAP, compared to 83 percent for all eligible people. The USDA has worked to decrease participation barriers for older Americans by simplifying the application and recertification processes and providing additional accommodations for elderly and disabled participants. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program serves more than 4 million seniors, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Only 42 percent of eligible elderly individuals participate in SNAP, compared to 83 percent for all eligible people. The USDA has worked to decrease participation barriers for older Americans by simplifying the application and recertification processes and providing additional accommodations for elderly and disabled participants. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)TopBuilt with Shorthand Welcome TCU Class of 2025 ReddIt Twitter Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ A fox’s tail: the story of TCU’s campus foxes Linkedin Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Image Magazine: Spring 2021 Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ + posts Previous articleHoroscope: January 25, 2021Next articleHoroscope: January 26, 2021 Haeven Gibbons Linkedin Twitter Facebook Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsCommunityFeaturesIn-depth reportingMultimediaTop StoriesHow the pandemic has affected the strategies of fighting hungerBy Haeven Gibbons – January 25, 2021 1436 Haeven Gibbons World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution ReddIt Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Facebook Life in Fort Worthlast_img read more

Winners announced in Limerick Edge/ Embrace Photography competition

first_imgTHE Limerick public has spoken and they have chosen the winners of Limerick Edge/Embrace Photography competition. They are:  Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up ·         Professional Category – Tony Clancy ·         Amateur Category – Natalia Sobiecka  To celebrate the new Limerick brand Limerick: Atlantic Edge, European Embrace unveiled earlier this year, both amateur and professional photographers had been invited to capture the beautiful contradictions of Limerick’s distinctive character, warm yet gritty; proud yet humble; creative, yet driven.  Professional Category – Tony Clancy There were 376 entries to the competition and judges narrowed the entries down to seven in the professional category and 14 in the amateur category. Each of the shortlisted photographs was uploaded onto the Limerick.ie Facebook page where voting took place for five days, closing this morning [Monday 02 November 2020] at 9am. More than 10,000 votes in total were cast. Tony’s amazing image captured at Curraghchase Camping Park ‘Embrace the Wilderness’ was the clear winner, chosen by 35 per cent of votes cast in the professional category. Limerick is a vibrant city full of character but Tony’s image also shows that Limerick boasts the most beautiful forest parks to relax, unwind and embrace the wilderness. The result in the amateur category was a lot tighter, with Natalia’s stunning photograph of the River Shannon winning with 21 per cent of the votes. Her riverside image cleverly captures the Limerick skyline, which is mirrored in the calm waters of the River Shannon as it heads towards the wild waters of the Atlantic. Coincidentally the contrails of a plane and its reflection are reminiscent of the angled lines of the ‘K’ from the Limerick brand. The winner of the amateur category will win a €1,000 voucher for Whelan Cameras, Limerick with a month long billboard display in Limerick city for the professional prize. Head of Marketing & Communications at Limerick City and County Council Laura Ryan said: “Huge congratulations to the winners. Their photographs are stunning and each one in their own way captures a different slice of Limerick.” “We were delighted with the response shown to the competition initially with so many entries and then with the reaction and contribution of the voters.” We would ask everyone to continue to take beautiful pictures of the many views, faces and characters of Limerick and share them using #LimerickEdgeEmbrace. Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Twitter TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post WhatsApp Facebook LimerickNewsWinners announced in Limerick Edge/ Embrace Photography competitionBy Meghann Scully – November 3, 2020 159 center_img Previous articleWATCH: Limerick Ladies Footballers advance to All-Ireland semi-finalNext articleLimerick authors included in new national campaign to celebrate Irish writers and rewards of reading during Covid-19 Meghann Scully WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Email Print Linkedin Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

Lucknow Bench Of The HC Suspends Physical Functioning From June 17; HC Summer Vacation Extended Till July 3 [Read Notices]

first_imgNews UpdatesLucknow Bench Of The HC Suspends Physical Functioning From June 17; HC Summer Vacation Extended Till July 3 [Read Notices] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK15 Jun 2020 8:43 PMShare This – xThe Lucknow Bench of the Allahabad High Court has suspended physical functioning of court from June 17 onwards. It is intimated that the High Court will resume to the virtual system that was being followed before re-opening of courts from June 8. In related news, the Administrative Committee of the Allahabad High Court has resolved to extend the period of HC summer vacation till July…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Lucknow Bench of the Allahabad High Court has suspended physical functioning of court from June 17 onwards. It is intimated that the High Court will resume to the virtual system that was being followed before re-opening of courts from June 8. In related news, the Administrative Committee of the Allahabad High Court has resolved to extend the period of HC summer vacation till July 3, 2020. Earlier, the High Court had restricted the period of summer vacation between June 22 and June 26, 2020. As per the intimation received from the Registrar General of the High Court, the period of summer vacation now stands modified to- June 22 till July 3, 2020. Read Notices Next Storylast_img read more

[Motor Vehicles Act] Person In Whose Name Vehicle Stands Registered On The Date Of Accident To Be Treated As ‘Owner’: SC [Read Judgment]

first_imgTop Stories[Motor Vehicles Act] Person In Whose Name Vehicle Stands Registered On The Date Of Accident To Be Treated As ‘Owner’: SC [Read Judgment] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK18 Jun 2020 8:47 PMShare This – x”If the insured continues to remain the owner in law in view of the statutory provisions of the Motor Vehicles Act, the Insurer cannot evade its liability in case of an accident.”The Supreme Court has observed that, it is the person in whose name the motor vehicle stands registered, who would be treated as the owner of the vehicle, for the purposes of the Motor Vehicles Act. The case arises out of an insurance claim made by one Surendra Kumar Bhilawe. The Insurance company repudiated the claim on the ground that Bhilawe had already sold the said truck to the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court has observed that, it is the person in whose name the motor vehicle stands registered, who would be treated as the owner of the vehicle, for the purposes of the Motor Vehicles Act. The case arises out of an insurance claim made by one Surendra Kumar Bhilawe. The Insurance company repudiated the claim on the ground that Bhilawe had already sold the said truck to the said Mohammad Iliyas Ansari (about three years ago). Bhilawe filed consumer complaint which was allowed by the District Forum. The appeal filed by the Insurance Company was dismissed by the State Commission. Setting aside both these orders, the the National Consumer Commission on the ground that when an owner of a vehicle sells his vehicle and executes a sale letter without in any manner postponing passing of the title to the property in the vehicle, the ownership in the vehicle passes to the purchaser on execution of the sale letter. In Appeal, the bench comprising Justices R. Banumathi and Indira Banerjee observed that the National Commission overlooked the definition of ‘owner’ in Section 2(30) of the Motor Vehicle Act, 1988. In Section 2(30) ‘owner’ has been defined to mean “a person in whose name a motor vehicle stands registered and, where such person is a minor, the guardian of such minor, and in relation to a motor vehicle which is the subject of a hire purchase agreement, or an agreement of lease or an agreement of hypothecation, the person in possession of the vehicle under that agreement”. It said: It would also be pertinent to note the difference between the definition of owner in Section 2(30) of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 and the definition of owner in Section 2(19) of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1939 which has been repealed and replaced by the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988. Under the old Act ‘owner’ meant the person in possession of a motor vehicle. The definition has undergone a change. Legislature has consciously changed the definition of ‘owner’ to mean the person in whose name the motor vehicle stands. Taking note of other factual circumstances, the bench further said: It is difficult to accept that a person who has transferred the ownership of a goods carriage vehicle on receipt of consideration, would not report the transfer or apply for transfer of registration, and thereby continue to incur the risks and liabilities of ownership of the vehicle under the provisions of law including in particular, under the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 and other criminal/penal laws. It does not also stand to reason why a person who has transferred the ownership of the vehicle should, for over three years, benevolently go on repaying the loan for purchase of the vehicle, take out insurance policies to cover the vehicle or otherwise discharge obligations of ownership. . It is equally incredible that an owner of a vehicle who has paid consideration to acquire the vehicle would not insist on transfer of the permit and thereby expose himself to the penal consequence of operating a goods vehicle without a valid permit. Referring to decisions like Pushpa @ Leela & Ors. vs. Shakuntala and Naveen Kumar vs. Vijay Kumar, the bench observed: “The dictum of this Court that the registered owner continues to remain owner and when the vehicle is Insured in the name of the registered owner, the Insurer would remain liable notwithstanding any transfer, would apply equally in the case of claims made by the insured himself in case of an accident. If the insured continues to remain the owner in law in view of the statutory provisions of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 and in particular Section 2(30) thereof, the Insurer cannot evade its liability in case of an accident. ” Allowing the appeal, the Court observed that Bhilawe remained the owner of the truck on the date of the accident and the Insurer could not have avoided its liability for the losses suffered by the owner on the ground of transfer of ownership to Mohammad Iliyas Ansari.Case no.: CIVIL APPEAL NO. 2632 OF 2020Case name: Surendra Kumar Bhilawe vs.The New India Assurance Company Limited Coram: Justices R. Banumathi and Indira BanerjeeClick here to Read/Download JudgmentRead Judgment Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Reflections On Prime Minister’s Tour Of Ayodhya

first_imgColumnsReflections On Prime Minister’s Tour Of Ayodhya Dinesh Dwivedi, Senior Advocate17 Aug 2020 1:49 AMShare This – xThere has been a considerable debate on the proprieties of PM Modi`s visit to Ayodhaya to inaugurate the Construction of Ram Temple on the 5th of August. In my opinion to have a correct view on this one has to split the personality of PM Modi into that of a PM of the nation at large and that of Shri Modi as an individual believer. As an individual believer he has the freedom to…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThere has been a considerable debate on the proprieties of PM Modi`s visit to Ayodhaya to inaugurate the Construction of Ram Temple on the 5th of August. In my opinion to have a correct view on this one has to split the personality of PM Modi into that of a PM of the nation at large and that of Shri Modi as an individual believer. As an individual believer he has the freedom to profess, practice and propagate religion close to his heart. This is what Article 25 guarantees to the individual believer. Interestingly this right is not confined to citizens only, but is there equally for the non-citizens. One can therefore rightly say that Shri Modi was well within his rights under Article 25 to profess, practice and preach the religion of his choice, as any other person. The situation alters drastically when Shri Modi takes a Constitutional oath to be PM of the Nation called India. He takes an Oath to “abide by the Constitution and the law”. This is the point of time when the split personality changes and becomes one. The individual morphs into a collective Institution for all Indians, irrespective of their caste, creed, religion and the rest. This collective Institution called the PM of the Nation, comes into existence only after taking the prescribed Oath to “abide by the Constitution”. What does this mean? It means that he has to abide by the “Constitutional Morality” as enshrined in the Constitution. The Preamble to the Constitution is the reservoir of all Constitutional morality. In short the Preamble proclaims India as a Secular Democratic Republic based on the resolve of “We the people of India” which includes both the majority and the minority. This goal was mandated to be achieved by enforcing Justice, liberty of faith and worship, and equality and Fraternity. The preamble further mandates the achieving of “unity and integrity” of the Nation on the plank of “Fraternity”. In other words “We the People” believed that the only way of achieving our basic goal of “Secular Democratic Republic” was through `Fraternity` based on Secularism, Justice, Liberty of Faith and Worship, as well as Equality. This in fact is the real mandate, encapsulated in the Oath, which our PM has taken for achieving the goals set in the Preamble. Constitutional morality is the foremost religion which our Prime Minister has to follow, to maintain “Fraternity, Unity and Integrity” of our nation. Every step he takes has to be guided by the morality. Though it is not defined yet the Constitution also speaks in silence. We can see this in another way. The right under Article 25 to profess, practice and preach, is not absolute, but is subject to “morality and public order”. “Morality” though not defined in the Constitution, is a wide word and most certainly includes the “Constitutional Morality” as explained earlier. The important thing to emphasise is that when Shri Narendra Modi morphs into the august institution of the PM, he is bound to observe his oath to respect, honor and observe the Constitutional morality embedded in the Preamble, in order to achieve the goals set therein. The right of Shri Modi under Article 25 to profess, practice and preach the religion of his choice gets subordinated to the Constitutional expression as well as silence. He has to act all the times, in accordance with the Constitutional responsibilities encapsulated in his oath. It is this morality, which PM Nehru spoke of when he advised the then President against going to inaugurate the newly built Somnath temple. He said “I confess that I do not like the idea of your (President) associating yourself with a spectacular opening of the Somnath Temple. This is not merely visiting a temple, which can be done by you or anyone else but rather participating in a significant function which unfortunately has number of implications”. The words “number of implications” is the key because now, more than ever, this holds true. Though the advice was not heeded by the President, yet Shri Nehru wrote to the Chief Ministers that the Central Government has nothing to do with it, as nothing should come in the way of State being Secular. Unlike Nehru I am not basing my argument only on Secularism. Can the PM of our Nation publically profess, practice or preach his religion as permitted under Article 25 of the Constitution. The Constitution is completely a-religious and equidistant from all religions. Would it remain equidistant from all religious if the PM starts professing and preaching his own religion publicly. Would it not be destructive of the Constitutional Morality and its ethos as well as the concept of equidistance from religion? This is what Shri Modi forgot as did the then President earlier, when they went with pomp and splendor to inaugurate the temples.SC Failed The Constitution By Succumbing To Majoritarianism In Ayodhya Case : Sr Adv Dinesh Dwivedi We can assess this in another way. When Nehru advised the then President to not to go to the Somnath Temple inauguration, his logic was based not only on the sacred Principle of Secularism but also on the “number of unfortunate implications”. The participation of PM at the Ayodhaya inauguration does have serious unfortunate implications. For this we need to run the background check of the Majid dispute and the Judgment. When Masjid was demolished by the Hindutva elements despite undertakings given by the then State Government, Supreme Court in 1994 caustically observed, `within a short time, the entire structure was demolished and razed to the ground. Indeed it was an act of ” National shame”. What was demolished was not merely an ancient structure, but the faith of the minorities in the sense of justice and fairplay of majority”. This has led some to say that idea of India was not demolished in Ayodhaya alone, but it happened in our liberal homes and minds. Besides the Masjid judgment of 2019 further reiterates and corroborates the shamefulness of the demolition. It rejects the claims of Hindus based on their belief that Masjid was constructed by Mir Baki by demolishing a Ram Mandir. The ASI survey done at the request of the Hindus openly debunked this belief. Not only this, the placement of idols in the year 1949 inside the inner courtyard of the Masjid as well as inside it, was also declared by the Supreme Court as unfair and illegal, done surreptitiously with the assistance of the local Collector. Both the acts of placement of idols in the masjid as well as its demolition were severely criticised by the Supreme Court in its Judgment as Unconstitutional and Criminally illegal. Thus on the one hand there was only an exploded belief of destruction of temple, while on the other, there was this reality of destruction of Masjid. It was a hotly contested dispute between two distinct faiths, which had resulted in lots of deaths and lasting acrimony. When the Supreme Court called the demolition of Masjid a national shame, it was because it demolished the faith of the minorities in the sense of justice and fairplay of the majority. It demolished the idea of India in our homes and minds. None of this could have subscribe to the Constitutional morality enshrined in our Constitution. It is this that our PM did not realize and appreciate in his zeal to be part of the inauguration ceremony. It did result in reviving the deep sense of wound and hurt caused earlier and with it, revived the deep chasm between the two great faiths of India. If anyone has any doubts in this regard, the remarkable silence of one of them was extremely portentous and loud. In such circumstances did it behoove our PM to tour Ahyodhya, is the moot question? More importantly did it subserve the cause of “Fraternity based on justice and equality”? PM Modi should have weighed and so should his fans “the unfortunate serious implications” of the visit. It inevitably reminds me of very pithy statement which I read recently “the moot question is, to honour which Ram, is the Ram Temple being built? The Ram whose name was on the lips of Mahatama Gandhi when Nathuram Godse shot and killed him or the Ram in whose name Nathuram Godse killed Gandhi. Every Indian who reveres Ram has to make this decision. The Institution of PM ought to have distinguished this truth fully and fairly. What was determined as a National “shame and breach” of faith could not be proclaimed as a national pride.Views are personal only.(Author is a Senior Advocate at the Supreme Court) Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img

Motor Accident Compensation : SC To Consider If Retrospective Pay Revision Of Govt Employee After Death Should Be Taken Into Account

first_imgNews UpdatesMotor Accident Compensation : SC To Consider If Retrospective Pay Revision Of Govt Employee After Death Should Be Taken Into Account LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK22 Jan 2021 7:27 AMShare This – xWhether pay revision applied retrospectively after the date of demise of a Government/public authorities employee is a factor taken into account while computing the monthly emoluments of the deceased for the purpose of determining compensation to him/her? The Supreme Court has issued notice in a special leave petition which raises this issue.The SLP challenges the Kerala High Court judgment…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginWhether pay revision applied retrospectively after the date of demise of a Government/public authorities employee is a factor taken into account while computing the monthly emoluments of the deceased for the purpose of determining compensation to him/her? The Supreme Court has issued notice in a special leave petition which raises this issue.The SLP challenges the Kerala High Court judgment which held that a subsequent pay revision cannot be considered for fixing income of a victim. To hold thus, the High Court had relied on Oriental Insurance Co. Ltd. v. Jashuden and others [(2008) 4 SCC 162] in which it was observed that only because salary was revised at a later point of time, the same by itself would not have been a factor which could have been taken into consideration for determining the amount of compensation.In this case, the deceased was a Development Officer and had died at the age of 51 year. Consequent to subsequent pay revision effected retrospectively, there was increase in the salary of the deceased. However, the Tribunal did not take into account the said pay revision for the purpose of granting compensation to the claimant. This view was later upheld by the High Court.In appeal, It was contended before the Apex Court bench comprising Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul and Hrishikesh Roy that the process of revision takes time in Government and public authorities. The petitioner also relied on Rajesh & Ors. v. Rajbir Singh & Ors. – (2013) 9 SCC 54 at 64, para 19 to contend that the subsequent pay revision was taken into account in the said case.”A reading of para 19, however, only shows the computation and does not specifically deal with the proposition. We are thus, of the view that this aspect would required to be considered by a three Judges Bench.”, the bench said while issuing notice.Case: SHYNO M. AYKARA @ SHEELAMMA THOMAS vs. NEW INDIA ASSURANCE COMPANY LTD. [SLP (C) No(s). 15192/2020]Click here to Read/Download OrderRead OrderNext Storylast_img read more

Answers to FBI quiz

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Answers to FBI quizOn 6 Feb 2001 in Personnel Today Answersto the FBI quiz1The correct answer is, of course, no. If you answered yes you will beautomatically disqualified from becoming an FBI special agent.2 C3 C4 A trick question because there is, officially, no wrong answer.5 D is the approved FBI sentence construction and grammar.Howdid you score?Quitefrankly, if you got less than four, it’s a case of don’t call the FBI and theywon’t call you. If you got all five right, you have to answer another crucialquestion: are you an American citizen? If the answer to that is no, you’restuffed. SorryQuestionsadapted from FBI sources and John Douglas’s Guide To Careers In The FBI(Kaplan) $15 ISBN: 0-684-85504-6Formore info log on to http://www.fbi.gov/employment/employ.htm Comments are closed. last_img read more

How to buy HR software: a 60-minute guide on-demand webinar

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. How to buy HR software: a 60-minute guide on-demand webinarOn 29 Feb 2016 in Personnel Today Download the transcription hereDownload the slides herecenter_img Related posts:No related photos. Watch this webinar now to make sure that you:know how to assess what your organisation needs;understand your company’s procedures and how they relate to HR technology;select a shortlist of the most viable HR software vendors; andknow how to make product demonstrations work for you.last_img

The Ego has Landed

first_imgTrue confidence, surely, is the ability to dismiss half of your own career as “parasitic” and “imposing” – only an actor, director and playwright such as Steven Berkoff could do such a thing without raising any eyebrows, and this did indeed seem to be his agenda when he spoke at the English faculty on 20 May. Berkoff laments the “castration of the actor” by theatre directors, proclaiming the latter to be expensive and excessive; have we met a professional theatre practitioner with genuine humility, or is this a brilliantly sophisticated placing of his own work above and outside of even his own profession? Steven Berkoff studied drama in London and Paris and performed modest roles with repertory companies before forming the London Theatre Group in 1968. His first original play, East, was staged in 1975 at the Edinburgh festival, followed by an array of varied works including West, Decadence, Greek, Kvetch, Acapulco and Brighton Beach Scumbags, all written in his indulgent, aggressive, yet cerebral style . As a director, Berkoff has toured tens of productions such as Kafka’s Metamorphosis, The Trial, Agamemnon, Hamlet, Macbeth, Wilde’s Salome, Richard II and Coriolanus. Several of these were international tours, to Japan, Los Angeles and Germany to name but a few. As an actor, his one-man show has toured Britain, the USA, South Africa, Finland, Italy, Singapore and Australia. He has made several dubious film appearances, including A Clockwork Orange, Octopussy and Rambo, and he directed and costarred in a film version of his play, Decadence. He has published a variety of books such as, modestly, I Am Hamlet, Meditations on Metamorphosis and his autobiography, Free Association. But despite an extensive biography, Berkoff’s popularity is questionable. He has made several un-politically- correct moves in his career including death threats towards critics and breaking an actors’ union strike by working on a McDonalds commercial. On the whole his ego seems to dominate his press; he doesn’t seem able to keep it in check. This fact was evident when he lectured, especially in his assaults on directors, set designers and critics. Having said this, his skills as an actor cannot be denied. His recent visit to the Oxford Playhouse with his touring show, “Shakespeare’s Villains” was a real treat, perhaps becauseof his unrestrained ego – there is something riveting about watching a stage actor without a shred of modesty deliver classic Shakespeare monologues juxtaposed with his own character interpretations and method, academically presented. Berkoff spoke extensively about acting in his Fourth Week lecture too, heralding it as a “great sacrifice;” as far as I could discern, a sacrifice of one’s own self-consciousness. Deeply ironic, I thought, coming from the most utterly self-indulgent of all thespians. Nonetheless he continued on to propose some reasonable, and rather beautiful, musings on acting, as “exposure to the acid of audience observation” and “maintaining childhood and playfulness” seemingly justifying his participation in this aspect of theatre. On he ploughed, however, to paint a darker picture of the director; an invention of the twentieth century, apparently, which has cost the theatre the loss of the “actor-manager” tradition of the Olivier era. According to Berkoff, actors of the 1800s were “masters of the theatre,” able to return to roles time and again and “flower” into great artists. Today they are at the mercy of the “caveman of theatre;” the director, who paints a replica of reality onto the stage like primitive rock art – his obsession with naturalism is deep-rooted and constraining. Berkoff himself has not, it must be noted, been directed for thirty years, through sheer obstinacy I believe. His objection to directors as a category stems from their youthfulness, since he claims that directing is a natural progression from acting, and thus the great actors of his time should now be becoming directors in a process resembling evolution. Instead, he laments, the profession is overrun with young directors, too weak to act themselves, yet preventing the rites of passage of their seniors. The reasons for young people’s interest in directing seem logical and unsurprising to me – better wages, your n a m e stamped upon a p r o – d u c – tion in the manner formerly enjoyed by actors, and very little responsibility for negative criticism (which is invariably targeted towards actors or playwrights). It is no surprise that the profession is popular. As a director myself, I am very interested in Berkoff’s writing. Despite hearing him slate the profession of directing, I am preparing a production of his as we speak – Messiah : Scenes from a Crucifixion (Old Fire Station Theatre, Eighth Week). How can I defend the process, in the face of such ironic egomaniacal insult? Firstly, it is no coincidence that Steven Berkoff has been touring one-man shows for many years and has not worked with a director for equally as long; he neglects to mention the essential function of equalizationand balance which only a directorial “outsideeye” can perform. Rehearsals are periods of “mixing,” rather like the musicp r o d u c t i o n sense of the term; actors need pushing and p u l l i n g i n t o l i n e with each othersince they have, after all, competing egos just like Berkoff’s. Whether this is conscious or not differs from actor to actor. Once performance level is reached, the discrepancies in experience and skill in the company should be invisible. Secondly, it takes guts to use the level of poetic symbolism Berkoff calls for in directing. Trusting the audience to understand and appreciate the suggestive, the abstract, the minimal, is a sacrifice just as significant as that of the actor, for we are sacrificing the safety of offering our audience something easy, something real. A director who sticks to naturalism does so with good reason – it is expected of him, in a dire self-fulfilling prophecy which is only aggravated by the lamentations from famous names such as Berkoff. My production of Messiah is not, incidentally, one such naturalistic production; it proposes an alternative hypothesis for the story of Jesus, told with the premise that he is not a superhero but an ordinary Jew with charisma, brains and a penchant for spin-doctoring. His last days and his crucifixion are distinctly non-naturalistic; I am attempting to make that sacrifice of safety, and prove Berkoff wrong. I do not think I am, as the director, “parasitic”, “imposing” or “unnecessary” – my process is a consultative, team-building and communally creative one. A director who abhors directing is rather like a chef who refuses to use the electric oven; is it the ultimate self-challenge, or rather an utterly unashamed superiority complex? (“All other directors are parasitic / ineffectual / dull – but I’m the example of how it should be done”) – in Steven Berkoff’s case, the answer is written all over his unfathomable (yet somehow endearing) ego.ARCHIVE: 5th week TT 2004last_img read more