Windy House / Estudio Valdés

first_imgSave this picture!© Alejandra Demaria+ 27 Share Windy House / Estudio Valdés CopyAbout this officeEstudio ValdésOfficeFollowProductsWoodStoneConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSanto DomingoHousesChilePublished on September 26, 2009Cite: “Windy House / Estudio Valdés” 26 Sep 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Surface: Nordic DécorDining tablesB&B ItaliaDining Table – BullSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights – Atrium Longlight / RidgelightLouvers / ShuttersBruagShading Screens – Perforated Facade PanelsConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteCompositesPure + FreeFormTechnical Guide – Creating a Seamless Interior and Exterior Material TransitionEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusDoorsGorter HatchesFloor Door – Fire RatedWire MeshCarl Stahl DecorCableGreen Wall System – FAÇADESCAPE™More products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Architects: Estudio Valdés Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/36111/windy-house-estudio-valdes Clipboard Houses Windy House / Estudio ValdésSave this projectSaveWindy House / Estudio Valdés CopyHouses•Santo Domingo, Chile Photographs:  Alejandra DemariaText description provided by the architects. This vacation home consists of two separate living areas that reside in a single home. This is an ideal vacation situation for extended family (grandparents, parents, and sons and daughters) as the home provides plenty of privacy for both families. The house is located on the coast of Santo Domingo, (Region V of Chile) in the upper part of the border coast which resembles a balcony over the beach with a great view at the pacific ocean.Save this picture!© Alejandra DemariaRecommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreWoodGustafsWood Veneered Wall & Ceiling PanelsWoodEGGERLaminatesThe Santo Domingo coast is defined by its windy landscape, with predominant winds from the S-W. The “s” is the reason why the house works as panel, keeping the terrace and swimming pool area very tranquil; the living room works as a “bifocal” between the ocean view and the terrace, protecting the back of the house from excess wind.The overarching concept of the house is that of a strong concrete module with great detail. Pilars and beams are accented by stone, basalt, cipres wood and glass. This orden goes to the whole project bringing harmony to the house in its details. Save this picture!© Alejandra DemariaThe structural module is demonstrated inside the house via the beams of house behind the tiles, the openings and closings between dwellings, and finally bringing at last a module order trough the whole project. At last the house works as a boutique Hotel where each passenger enjoy the pleasure of each room and the elegance of the public spaces wich are very confortable places to be. The kitchen as and example it s worked as dining room keeping out materials often use to this spaces.Save this picture!© Alejandra DemariaProject gallerySee allShow lessMONU Magazine New Issue: Clean UrbanismArticlesAD Round Up: ORDOS 100 Part IIArticles Share “COPY” ArchDaily Area:  3000 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  Chile ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/36111/windy-house-estudio-valdes Clipboard 2005 Projects “COPY” Photographslast_img read more

BYU Football Will Not Host Spectators For Texas-San Antonio Saturday

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah-In a statement from the Brigham Young University athletic department Tuesday, it was confirmed the No. 15 football team’s Saturday game against Texas-San Antonio will feature no fans at LaVell Edwards Stadium.BYU Athletics has announced the UTSA-BYU game on Saturday, Oct. 10, will be played without spectators at LaVell Edwards Stadium. https://t.co/3z0pKmv0qU#BYUFOOTBALL pic.twitter.com/qFudNsbx0U— BYU FOOTBALL (@BYUfootball) October 6, 2020This decision was based on the fact that Utah Gov. Gary Herbert still has placed the cities of Provo and Orem under orange, or moderate risk, for covid-19.The governor’s office has made it clear that this restriction will not have ended by this weekend’s game against the Roadrunners.You can listen to this game on KSVC AM and FM or online at midutahradio.com with a 1:00 pm pregame and a 1:30 pm kickoff.However, the BYU athletic department remains hopeful that fans may be able to attend the Cougars’ October 24 home game against the Texas State Bobcats. Written by Tags: BYU Football October 6, 2020 /Coronavirus (COVID-19) related news and sports stories, Sports News – Local BYU Football Will Not Host Spectators For Texas-San Antonio Saturday Brad Jameslast_img read more

Thursday October 17th Local Sports

first_imgMASON CITY — Both of NIACC’s cross country teams remain ranked in this week’s Division I polls. The Lady Trojans are ranked 14th after placing fourth in their own Trent Smith Invitational last Friday. Iowa Central is ranked first in the women’s poll followed by Southern Idaho. Iowa Western out of the conference is ranked 10th. The NIACC men are ranked 17th in this week’s poll after placing fifth in the Trent Smith Invitational last week. Cloud County Community College of Kansas is ranked first, with three other conference members being ranked in the top 25 — Iowa Central third, Iowa Western sixth and Hawkeye Community College 22nd. Both NIACC teams are off until the Region XI meet in Ottumwa on October 25th. AMES — Iowa State’s emerging ground game has given the Cyclone offense more confidence heading into this week’s game at Texas Tech. ISU has averaged 166 yards on the ground the past two weeks and senior receiver La’Michael Pettway believes it will lead to more big plays.Freshman running back Breece Hall burst onto the scene with 132 yards on the ground in a win at West Virginia.Sophomore receiver Tarique Milton says the emergence of Hall gives the Cyclones an added dimension.Kickoff in Lubbock is scheduled for 11 o’clock on Saturday AMES — A new look Iowa State basketball team will be out to make another post-season run. The Cyclones lost nearly half the roster off of last year’s team that won the Big 12 tournament title and coach Steve Prohm has been searching for the right combinations.Michael Jacobson returns along the front line and sophomore guard Tyrese Haliburton was named to pre-season All Big 12 first team.Prohm says Haliburton will be counted on to log a lot of minutes.A key addition will be Penn State transfer Rasir Bolton at guard.A tough Big 12 race will be part of what Prohm calls a demanding schedule.The Cyclones open at home on November fifth against Mississippi Valley State. IOWA CITY — The Iowa Hawkeyes will be out to snap a two game losing streak this week when they host Purdue. Freshman receiver Nico Ragaini  says the Hawkeyes are focused on what still can be accomplished.Quarterback Nate Stanley says they have gone back to work in hopes of fixing an offense that has scored only one touchdown in two games.Iowa safety Geno Stone says there has not been a loss of confidence.Kickoff at Kinnick Stadium is scheduled for 11 o’clock, with the pre-game starting at 9 o’clock on AM-1300 KGLO IOWA FALLS — Kennedy Meister earned her 1000th career dig on Wednesday night as the NIACC volleyball team swept Ellsworth three sets to nothing — 25-11, 25-14 and 25-12. NIACC is 6-1 in conference play and 24-8 overall. The Lady Trojans remain in a three-way tie atop the conference standings with Iowa Central and Northeast Community College, with Iowa Central beating Southeastern and Northeast sweeping Southwestern last night. NIACC travels to the Iowa Lakes tournament with two matches each on Friday and Saturday.last_img read more

Residents of Trump Plaza Palm Beach donate food to local food bank

first_imgThe residents of Trump Plaza of the Palm Beaches have been collecting food to donate to the Palm Beach County Food Bank.Residents have been working together all week to collect bags of food for those in the community that have been affected by the pandemic.The Palm Beach County Food Bank is scheduled to be pick up the denotations at Friday at 5:00pm.  During the pick up, residents plan to stand on their balcony and cheer.last_img

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

first_imgDESORMEAUX DUO GETS DISTANCE TEST IN FRONTRUNNERKeith Desormeaux has horses entered in four races Saturday, including Straight Fire and Vibe in the FrontRunner Stakes and Decked Out in the Rodeo Drive Stakes.Seven two-year-olds were entered in the 1 1/16-mile FrontRunner, seeking to prove they can successfully negotiate two turns for the first time.“Street Fire is obviously talented and we’re hoping he can stretch his speed to a mile and a sixteenth, but it’s not written in stone,” Desormeaux said. “We’ll have to see how he does in the race. I wish I could say that there’s no doubt he can get a distance, but I’m not sure.“Vibe, there’s no doubt he can get the distance, but I don’t know how fast he is, so we’re just taking a shot. It’s a short field; he’s got a great post position.”As for Decked Out, Desormeaux is cautiously optimistic.“It’s a tall order,” he said, “first time against older horses, it’s another eighth of a mile, but since she’s run some great numbers and the Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare Turf is right here in our backyard, why not take a chance at glory? That’s what we’re doing.”The FrontRunner, which goes as race six: Gormley, Victor Espinoza, 8-1; Plum Dandy, Mike Smith, 8-1; Secret House, Santiago Gonzalez, 20-1; Midnight Pleasure, Martin Garcia, 6-1; Straight Fire, Flavien Prat, 9-5; Klimt, Rafael Bejarano, 6-5; and Vibe, Kent Desormeaux, 20-1.FINISH LINES: Future plans are on hold for Santa Anita Derby, Preakness and Haskell winner Exaggerator, who finished seventh in the Pennsylvania Derby last Saturday. “He’s on his way to WinStar (Farm in Versailles, Ky. from Churchill Downs) as we speak,” trainer Keith Desormeaux said Friday morning at Santa Anita. “He’s going there for a freshening and we’ll huddle up with their people to see if the (Breeders’ Cup) Classic is still under consideration, but we’re not sure yet. He’s in WinStar’s hands now.” . . . Santa Anita Handicap and Gold Cup winner Melatonin, training up to the Breeders’ Cup Classic on Nov. 5, is scheduled to work six furlongs Sunday morning for David Hofmans . . . Bob Baffert seeks his eighth win in the FrontRunner Stakes when he sends out Klimt tomorrow . . . Jose Mercado, groom to the great John Henry when he was on his Hall of Fame roll with Ron McAnally, will present a trophy to the winning connections of Sunday’s Grade II, $200,000 John Henry Stakes. . . John Doyle, 2010 NHC champion ($500,000), and Santa Anita Simulcast host Megan Devine, will be Tom Quigley‘s guests, Saturday and Sunday, respectively, 11:20 a.m. in the East Paddock Gardens . . . Santa Anita offers attractive and potentially game-changing guaranteed exotic wagering pools during the Autumn Meet, notably: $300,000 Late Pick 4 opening day; $750,000 Late Pick 4 and $100,000 Pick 6 this Saturday, Oct. 1; $500,000 Late Pick 4 and $100,000 Pick Six Sunday. Oct. 2; $300,000 Late Pick 4 Thursday, Fridays and Monday, Oct. 10 following opening weekend; and $500,000 Late Pick 4 and $100,000 Pick 6 Saturdays and Sundays following opening weekend . . . Santa Anita hosts Oktoberfest Trackside tomorrow. Beer, Oktoberfest-themed games, German-inspired cuisine, beer tasting, a Santa Anita Park trucker cap, souvenir steins and more will be available. CHROME COUNTDOWN IN ITS FINAL STAGESBUSY SATURDAY FOR KEITH DESORMEAUXWINSTAR MULLS CLASSIC FOR EXAGGERATOR ESPINOZA: CHROME IS THE BEST HORSEPerhaps Victor Espinoza’s most natural trait is his easy going, roll-with-the-punches attitude.Sitting on a couch opposite David Letterman before millions of TV viewers or on California Chrome in a million dollar race, the self-described “happy Mexican” is as soothing as Sinatra’s phrasing.Espinoza will ride California Chrome in Saturday’s Awesome Again Stakes for the 17th straight race. He has won 12.“He’s better than ever now and the way he’s run the last three times shows that,” Espinoza said. “He looks outstanding, but we’ll see what happens. Every race is different. For me, I just go race by race and whatever happens, win or lose, to me he’s still the best horse.“The most important thing is that he comes out of the race healthy and stays in one piece. That’s it.”Friday morning, Chrome schooled at the gate and galloped a mile and three-quarters.The field for the Awesome Again, the seventh of nine races with a 12:30 p.m. first post: California Chrome, Victor Espinoza, 2-5; Dortmund, Rafael Bejarano, 5-2; Hoppertunity, Flavien Prat, 6-1; Win the Space, Gary Stevens, 20-1; Soi Phet, Kent Desormeaux, 30-1; El Huerfano, Martin Pedroza, 50-1; and Hard Aces, Santiago Gonzalez, 15-1.The Awesome Again is one of five Grade I, “Win and You’re In” Breeders’ CupChallenge events on the second day of Santa Anita’s 23-day Autumn Meet.NBCSN will air the Awesome Again in a two-and-a-half-hour telecast that starts at 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time.Santa Anita hosts the Breeders’ Cup World Championships for an unprecedented ninth time on Nov. 4 and 5.Supporting the Awesome Again are the Zenyatta Stakes for fillies and mares, three and up, at 1 1/16 miles; the FrontRunner Stakes for two-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles; the Chandelier Stakes for two-year-old fillies at 1 1/16 miles; and the Rodeo Drive Stakes for fillies and mares, three and up, at 1 ¼ miles on turf.Victory gives the winning horse in each race a fees paid berth to its respective Breeders’ Cup event.Next Saturday, Oct. 8, the Grade I Santa Anita Sprint Championship for three year olds and up at six furlongs will serve as a springboard to the $1.5 million TwinSpires Breeders’ Cup Sprint on Nov. 5.last_img read more

Raiders need Carr running smoothly for brutal stretch ahead

first_imgGoing forward, the Raiders can’t afford six such … OAKLAND — It looked promising at the outset.Raiders’ quarterback Derek Carr was in command, taking the Raiders 65 yards on their first possession for a 28-yard field goal by Daniel Carlson, then directing a 74-yard six play drive to make it 10-0. He even passed Ken Stabler as having the most career passing yardage in franchise history.And then?Punt, punt, punt, punt, interception, interception . . . Chiefs 28, Raiders 10.last_img

How Bambi Gave Rise to Moby Dick

first_imgThe title of this entry, in Kipling Just-So Story format, is only slightly modified from an article from The Guardian, titled, “How Bambi evolved into Moby-Dick.”  This is not a joke; check on the link and see.    The article is about the latest fossil claimed to be ancestral to whales.  Hans Thewissen (Northeastern Ohio College of Medicine) has spent many years trying to trace an evolutionary path to whales from artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates, a group of mammals including deer, cattle, sheep, goats, giraffes, pigs, and camels).  This was the subject of a chapter in the PBS Evolution series, “Great Transformations,” in 2001 (see review on ReviewEvolution.com).  Thewissen’s latest candidate missing link is a raccoon-size deer-like fossil animal found in Kashmir; the discovery and analysis was published in Nature.1  The Guardian was ebullient in its certainty that this is the link:The landmark finding represents a long-sought ‘missing link’ in the 10m-year [10 million year] journey that saw ancient land mammals evolve into modern cetaceans, a group that includes whales, dolphins and porpoises.”    Scientists have long known that whales are mammals whose ancient ancestors walked on land, but only in the past 15 years have they unearthed fossils that shed light on the creatures’ dramatic evolutionary history.  The latest discovery, named Indohyus, is the first whale ancestor known to have lived on land.On what basis did Thewissen and his team think this fossil had anything to do with whales?  The teeth are “similar to those of aquatic animals,” and the bones suggest a heavy stance like that of hippos.  The bones around the inner ear look similar to those of cetaceans, the article claims.  That’s about all the data this article mentioned, yet the certainty that this represents the missing link continued:The evolutionary path of the whale is one of the most extraordinary on record.  In less than 10m years, the whale’s ancestors completely transformed as they shifted from a four-legged life on land to a life in the ocean.    The first whales, Pakicetidae, emerged around 50m years ago and resembled land mammals rather than the giant marine creatures of today.  These evolved into large, powerful coastal whales, or Ambulocetidae, that had big feet and strong tails.  Later, whales lost their hind limbs and hair and developed powerful tail fins and flippers.One difficulty is that this fossil “overturns a previous assumption that the ancestors of whales were already carnivores before they left land for a life beneath the waves.”  Being a herbivore, what was it doing in the water?  Thewissen thinks it was acting like the modern mouse deer of Africa, which escapes from eagles by diving under the water for up to four minutes.    To reinforce the missing-link message of Indohyus, the article stuck it to the creationists:Fred Spoor, an anthropologist at University College London, said the significance of the latest find was comparable to Archaeopteryx, the first fossils to show a clear transition between dinosaurs and birds.  “For years cetaceans were used by creationists to support their views because for a long time the most primitive whales known had bodies that looked like modern whales, so there seemed to be this enormous gap in evolution.  But since the early 1990s, there’s been a rapid succession of fossils from India and Pakistan that beautifully fill that gap,” he said.    “The tables are turned now because we have fossils that show that dramatic transition step by step.  Cetaceans are almost the only group that has made such a rapid change from a land environment to an aquatic one.  “Unlike sealions and seals, which still spend some time on land, cetaceans are completely committed to the water now, and it had an enormous effect on their physiology.  They had to change everything.”This last sentence, they had to change everything, makes it sound as if the whales directed their mutations with the goal of becoming aquatic – that is most certainly not what the evolutionists mean.  Such language, however, blurs the way the Darwinian mechanism is supposed to work.  Individual members of Indohyus or cetaceans could not possibly know or care what was happening to them.  Evolution works on the genes in large populations over a long, drawn-out process involving mutations selection pressures without any goal in mind – certainly not in the minds of any individual animals.  No amount of individual striving gets passed on to the offspring – that would be Lamarckism.    The article ends with the “more work to do” theme, but includes more purpose-driven language on the part of the whales:Thewissen’s group will next study Indohyus further to learn more about its diet and habitat.  One critical change that occurred when whales took to the water involved its sense of balance and orientation.  In land mammals, this is governed by a vestibulary system in the inner ear, but whales had to adapt to moving in three dimensions, driving the evolution of a more complex system.    “This fossil completes the picture in terms of the whales’ evolution, but what’s next is to look at these other evolutionary adaptations,” said Thewissen.So the frame of the puzzle is done, and now it’s just a matter of filling in the middle.  Is that what the original paper said?  In the journals, scientists tend to be more reserved in their announcements than in the popular press.  It’s interesting that for a discovery this “dramatic” there was no review article accompanying the paper.    The abstract says that Indohyus was a “sister group” to the whales.  This means it was not on the path to whalehood, but both had a common ancestor.  Claims that whale evolution is “documented” and “strongly supported” continue in the paper, but the opening paragraph leads one to suspect that a single fossil species like Indohyus cannot be expected to solve all the problems:Phylogenetic analyses of molecular data on extant animals strongly support the notion that hippopotamids are the closest relatives of cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises).  In spite of this, it is unlikely that the two groups are closely related when extant and extinct artiodactyls are analysed, for the simple reason that cetaceans originated about 50 million years (Myr) ago in south Asia, whereas the family Hippopotamidae is only 15 Myr old, and the first hippopotamids to be recorded in Asia are only 6 Myr old.  However, analyses of fossil clades have not resolved the issue of cetacean relations.  Proposed sister groups ranged from the entire artiodactyl order, to the extinct early ungulates mesonychians, to an anthracotheroid clade (which included hippopotamids), to weakly supporting hippopotamids (to the exclusion of anthracotheres.Indohyus is an Eocene artiodactyl in a group Raoellidae, which previously had no linkage to the whale line.  Thewissen et al are therefore making a radical new hypothesis.  “This has profound implications for the character transformations near the origin of cetaceans and the cladistic definition of Cetacea, and identifies the habitat in which whales originated,” they say.  “Taken together, our findings lead us to propose a new hypothesis for the origin of whales.”    New hypotheses, however, tend to create as many problems as they solve, because old assumptions get discarded.  Evolutionists have already been claiming for years that the whale evolution story is strongly supported with other fossils.  How can a specimen from a small, extinct deer-like animal wedge its way into an existing story?  It becomes necessary to juggle things around:To investigate the importance of raoellids in cetacean phylogeny, we excluded raoellids from our initial phylogenetic analysis of artiodactyls plus cetaceans.  Our data set differed from previous analyses by the addition of several archaic anthracotheres, and some corrected scores for pakicetid cetaceans.  This analysis found stronger support for hippopotamid�cetacean sister-group relations than the previous analysis, consistent with molecular studies.  However, the base of the artiodactyl cladogram is poorly resolved (see Supplementary Information for details on phylogenetic runs).This is how phylogenetic analysis is really done.  Assumptions are made, and some earlier associations get tossed by the wayside in an effort to achieve a desired amount of “consistency.”  So Thewissen and team changed the recipe and got some new flavors:In a second cladistic analysis (Fig. 2), we added the raoellids Khirtharia and Indohyus as well as several archaic ungulate groups (condylarths) and found that raoellids and cetaceans are sister groups and that they are the basal node in the Cetacea/Artiodactyla clade, consistent with some previous analyses that used different character sets.  Our analysis is the first to show that raoellids are the sister group to cetaceans, resolving the biogeographic conundrum and closing the temporal gap between cetaceans and their sister.  Relations between most artiodactyl families higher in the tree are poorly resolved, and our data lack implications for the relations between these families.  Our analysis strongly argues that raoellids and cetaceans are more closely related to each other than either is to hippopotamids.This is a human line of argument – not a single, clear, uncontroversial picture emerging inescapably from the data.  Everything is inference: trying to find a pathway through scattered data points, after first assuming a pathway exists.  The reader should not picture a straight line from Indohyus to Blue Whale.  The human researchers are picking their way through a data forest with a goal in mind.  The forest is not leading them on a single yellow brick road.    Indohyus, for instance, has a thickening around its middle ear that was thought diagnostic of cetaceans.  What does this mean?  The paper presents two possibilities: either Indohyus was similar to whales, or this trait can no longer be thought characteristic of whales.  As with Tiktaalik, the data present mosaics of traits that require human judgment about what goes with what clade, and which clades are closer or farther apart.    In the paper, the team considered various groupings, but made decisions based on their own preferences: e.g., regarding one alternative tree, they said, “We do not prefer this classification because it causes instability by significantly altering the traditional content of both Artiodactyla and Cetacea.”  The team sought the most “parsimonious” tree of descent – but parsimony is a human value, not a whale value.  Not even all humans will agree what constitutes parsimony.    The team acknowledged that cetaceans and raoellids possess some synapomorphies (derived traits shared by terminal groups), but then said, “None of these features characterize all modern and extinct cetaceans; the dental characters, for instance, cannot be scored in toothless mysticetes.  In addition, all of these characters are found in some mammals unrelated to cetaceans.”  There are multiple ways to interpret the data, therefore.  The synapomorphies might indicate relationship – or, they could overthrow assumptions about which traits are diagnostic of which clades.  Clearly, this team did not attach any significance to the similarities that didn’t fit a deer-to-whale lineage.  “We attach particular importance to two character complexes that characterize basal cetaceans,” they said, but that assumes what needs to be proved (circular reasoning).    The team attached great importance to the teeth.  But Indohyus, they said, was a herbivore, and whales are carnivores; how much about relationship can be inferred from teeth of groups with very different dietary habits and behaviors?  What kind of tree would have resulted had they attached particular importance to other traits?  One can imagine other evolutionary paleontologists having their own assumptions, preferences, methodologies, and arriving at very different conclusions.     Other traits were mentioned that do not help the story of whale evolution.  The team noticed that the leg bones showed osteoporosis, which they interpreted as meaning that Indohyus was stable in the water – but not a swimmer: “We interpret the limb osteosclerosis of Indohyus to be related to bottom walking and not to slow swimming, because the limbs are gracile and not modified into paddles.”  Other mammals, however, like beaver and otters and sea lions, show more modifications for aquatic lifestyle than this creature, and no one lumps them into a whale phylogeny.  So even if the oxygen or carbon isotopic ratios in the tooth enamel show a probability the creature lived a good part of its time in the water, how much can this tell us about its evolutionary path?  As a matter of fact, the team decided the diet of Indohyus was significantly different than whale diet.    So here is the long and short about this creature:Indohyus was a small, stocky artiodactyl, roughly the size of the raccoon Procyon lotor (Fig. 5).  It was not an adept swimmer; instead it waded in shallow water, with its heavy bones providing ballast to keep its feet anchored.  Indohyus may have fed on land, although a specialized aquatic diet is also possible.Whales do not use their bones as ballast to stay anchored to the bottom.  They do not eat vegetables.  They do not walk on four feet.  By what kind of convoluted reasoning can a raccoon-size deer be considered ancestral to dolphins and blue whales?    Even if it spent more time in water than the modern mouse deer, many mammals are accustomed to water: moose, bears, water buffalo, and of course otter and beaver – why are they not in the race to become whale ancestor?  The researchers even admitted that “The great evolutionary change that occurred at the origin of cetaceans is thus not the adoption of an aquatic lifestyle.”  They pinned all their inference on diet: “Here we propose that dietary change was the event that defined cetacean origins,” they said – but that is a radically new proposal from what they said before, because Indohyus eats plants, and whales don’t.  By all measures, it seems this new creature is even further removed from whale ancestry than the last candidate.    Their ending paragraph summarized the just-so story of how Bambi evolved into Moby Dick:Our working hypothesis for the origin of whales is that raoellid ancestors, although herbivores or omnivores on land, took to fresh water in times of danger.  Aquatic habits were increased in Indohyus (as suggested by osteosclerosis and oxygen isotopes), although it did not necessarily have an aquatic diet (as suggested by carbon isotopes).  Cetaceans originated from an Indohyus-like ancestor and switched to a diet of aquatic prey.  Significant changes in the morphology of the teeth, the oral skeleton and the sense organs made cetaceans different from their ancestors and unique among mammals.This is, as they themselves said, only a “working hypothesis” at best.  Compare that with the triumphal announcements in the The Register quoted at the beginning of this entry: “The tables are turned now [against the creationists] because we have fossils that show that dramatic transition step by step.”Update 12/26/2007: Science Now reported on the Thewissen claim, but ended with an alternative: “Another analysis, in press at Cladistics, suggests that an extinct group of carnivorous mammals, called mesonychids, were more closely related to cetaceans.”  Mesonychids looked less like Bambi and more like the Big Bad Wolf.  The only similarity seems to be that they were equidistant from Moby Dick.1.  Thewissen, Cooper, Clementz, Bajpai and Tiwari, “Whales originated from aquatic artiodactyls in the Eocene epoch of India,” Nature 450, 1190-1194 (20 December 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature06343.Will evolutionists actually tell lies to push their beliefs?  Yes—you saw it right here.  Fred Spoor told you that Archaeopteryx represents a clear transition between dinosaurs and birds, when he knows full well it appeared too late in his own evolutionary timeline to be a missing link (10/24/2005).  The big lie in the Nature article, and in the popular press, was to portray this fossil discovery as a great victory for evolution, and a step-by-step sequence showing the whole ancestry.  It is no more victory than picking up a spent lottery ticket on the dusty ground and thinking it is a missing link to riches.    Philosophers of science could have some good banter about the logic of discovery – whether they discovered something true to nature in the data, or imposed their own experiences and preferences on the data.  Clearly, this team decided to pick and choose a few traits from a fossil they preferred over other problematical ones, and from these to weave a whale of a just-so story with which to dupe the public and shoot the creationists.  Well, their shot only hurt as much as a blast of bad breath in the face, that’s all.  You know what to expect from National Geographic, and you got it: “Whales Evolved from Tiny Deerlike Mammals, Study Says.”  The bigger the whopper, the better; have it your way, NG (10/24/2004).  Not to be left behind in the Whopper Olympics, the BBC News trumpeted, “Whale ‘missing link’ discovered.”    This is the mess of things that Charlie Darwin left in his wake when he allowed the magicians and storytellers into the once noble halls of science (12/22/2003 commentary).  It’s time to clear house and clean up.  Send the whole lot of them back to school to learn some history and philosophy and ethics, and make them sign a commitment to speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.  That would solve most of the problems in the contentious creation-evolution debate.    Bambi to Moby Dick—incredible.  PhD scientists actually believe that?  They want that taught in the schools?  We need a new word that means to laugh and cry at the same time, because this whale of a tale deserves a whopping blubberfest.  Maybe the word howl will do.  Perhaps this is why the humpback whales are howling.(Visited 47 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Dockworkers to Go on New Strike at APM Terminals Gothenburg

first_imgzoom The Swedish Dockworkers’ Union (SDU), which includes 85% of the dockworkers at the Gothenburg terminal, plans to organize a new strike at APM Terminals Gothenburg on January 24, 2017, “after being barred from representing its members at upcoming redundancy negotiations.”The strike, which will take place from 12:00 to 20:00 P.M. local time, will be held in an effort “to re-establish a normal Swedish negotiation model, preventive health & safety in the workplace and other basic rights.”“Despite ongoing dialogue and already planned discussions with the Dockworkers Union next week, APM Terminals today at lunch receive new notice for industrial action,” APM Terminals Gothenburg said.There is already a ban on overtime and restrictions on the use of casuals in the largest container terminal in Scandinavia, according to the SDU.The APMT Gothenburg dispute has been ongoing since spring 2016, caused by a change in the company’s personnel policies.In December 2016, the SDU and the International Dockworkers’ Council proposed an initial three-month period without industrial action in an effort to establish constructive negotiations for a new production model at the terminal.According to the SDU, APMT management responded declaring “it was not willing to make any counter-commitments or compromises concerning the issues at hand.”APM Terminals reportedly intends to lay off up to 60 dockworkers on temporary as well as permanent employment contracts (most of them SDU members), denying them the right to be represented by their own union.last_img read more

Neighbourhoods north of Edmonton allowed to go home after CN train derails

first_imgST. ALBERT, Alta. – Residents from dozens of homes who had to leave their homes on Sunday after a train carrying crude derailed north of Edmonton were quickly allowed to return.CN Rail says 12 rail cars carrying crude oil derailed Sunday afternoon in Sturgeon County.A news release from the company says two of the cars released some oil, but it says those leaks have been stopped.Two neighbourhoods in Sturgeon County were evacuated as a precaution, affecting about 46 homes, but the county announced several hours later that the evacuation was over.A news release from the county says only a small amount of crude leaked — between 30 and 50 litres.CN spokesman Patrick Waldron says there’s no reports of the oil leaking into a waterway.“We have personnel on the scene working with emergency responders, and more resources are being mobilized to continue that response and complete a full assessment of the incident,” Waldron said by phone earlier on Sunday.There were no reports of injuries.CN says environmental teams are on the scene to begin a clean-up.The railway says the cause of the derailment is under investigation.last_img read more