Court gives editor four years in prison for libelling president

first_img October 7, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Court gives editor four years in prison for libelling president News April 6, 2020 Find out more November 27, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts RSF_en Coronavirus infects press freedom in Africa Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent Reporters Without Borders strongly condemned the Sierra Leone high court’s decision to sentence Paul Kamara, the founder and editor of the daily For Di People, to a total of four years in prison for “seditiously” libelling President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. Kamara was convicted under the Public Order Act of 1965, the repeal of which has been repeatedly but unsuccessfully requested by the Sierra Leone Association of Journalists (SLAJ). to go further Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders today strongly condemned the Sierra Leone high court’s decision on 5 October to sentence Paul Kamara (photo), the founder and editor of the daily For Di People, to a total of four years in prison for “seditiously” libelling President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah.”The victim of unceasing harassment by the judicial apparatus, Paul Kamara must be freed immediately”, the organisation said. “This heavy sentence at the end of a trial full of legal quibbling looks more like a harsh punishment for a dissident voice than a fair decision aimed at keeping the peace.”Reporters Without Borders said the Kabbah government had ignored calls from Sierra Leone’s journalists to repeal the law which it uses to crack down on its press critics and which enabled the court to impose such a heavy prison sentence on Kamara.Noting that the tasks assigned to the local UN mission, UNAMSIL, under Security Council resolution 1562 include monitoring and promoting respect for human rights, the organisation called on the mission to encourage the government to “decriminalise press offences, as other countries in Africa have done”.The Freetown high court No. 2, presided over by Justice Bankole Rashid, sentenced Kamara to two 24-month prison terms to run concurrently. The manager of John Love Printers, Brima Sesay, was sentenced to two six-month prison terms to run concurrently, or a fine of 10,000 leones (about 5 euros). The owner of the printers, Lovette Charles, and its administrator, Joseph Charles, were acquitted. Kamara was taken from court to Freetown prison.The offending article appeared in the 3 October 2003 issue of For di People. Headlined “Speaker of Parliament challenge! Kabbah is a true convict !”, it reported that a commission of enquiry had in 1968 found Kabbah – then finance minister – guilty of fraud. It also said it was unconstitutional of the parliamentary speaker to maintain that Kabbah enjoys immunity from prosecution as president.Kamara has had repeated run-ins with the authorities. He was convicted under the Public Order Act of 1965, the repeal of which has been repeatedly but unsuccessfully requested by the Sierra Leone Association of Journalists (SLAJ). It provides for prison sentences for libel and establishes that printers and vendors of can be prosecuted for the “crime” as well as journalists. Reports March 29, 2020 Find out more Sierra LeoneAfrica Organisation Follow the news on Sierra Leone News Sierra LeoneAfrica News The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africalast_img read more

Collopy brothers granted free legal aid

first_imgKieran Collopy leaving court following his arrest in connection with the seizure of €50,000 worth of heroin in LimerickAndrew Carey [email protected] Limerick brothers charged in connection with a €50,000 heroin haul at a house in St Mary’s Park have been granted free legal aid. Brian Collopy (43) of Killonan, Ballysimon and Kieran Collopy (40) of St Ita’s Street, St Mary’s Park are charged with possession of herion for sale or supply on December 15. There had been a Garda objection to Kieran Collopy being granted free legal aid on the basis that he “traveled abroad frequently and had access to substantial means”. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up However, after both men submitted statements of means, legal aid was granted and the case adjourned to March 8 for service of the book of evidence. Both men were remanded in continuing custody to that date. Linkedin Email WhatsApp Print Advertisementcenter_img NewsCollopy brothers granted free legal aidBy Staff Reporter – February 25, 2016 561 Facebook Twitter Previous articleDamages award for Limerick boy who was in two crashesNext article#Limerick man aims to twin pubs around the world Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more

Italian Navy’s eighth FREMM frigate takes to sea

first_img The Italian Navy’s FREMM frigate Antonio Marceglia has been taken to sea in the Gulf of La Spezia for the first time, Organisation for Joint Armament Co-operation (OCCAR) said. During its first time at sea on June 19, 2018, several platform and combat system elements installed onboard were set up, turned on and tested successfully, according to OCCAR.Built by Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri, the frigate was launched at Riva Trigoso shipyard in February 2018.Antonio Marceglia is the eight of the navy’s ten FREMM frigates built under the framework of an Italo-French cooperation program coordinated by OCCAR. The program includes the construction of a total of eighteen ships for both navies.With a full-load displacement of 6,900 tons, the frigates feature a length of 144 meters and a breadth of 19.7 meters. Italian Navy’s eighth FREMM frigate takes to sea View post tag: ITS Antonio Marceglia Back to overview,Home naval-today Italian Navy’s eighth FREMM frigate takes to sea June 27, 2018 View post tag: FREMM Authorities View post tag: Italian Navy Share this articlelast_img read more