Occupational Therapy Adjunct Assistant Professor

first_imgPosting NumberF00136P All Positions: Offers of employment are contingent upon thesuccessful clearance from a criminal background check, freedom fromtuberculosis, and proof of identity and eligibility to work in theUnited States prior to the first day of work. The District mayselect additional qualified candidates should unexpected vacanciesor needs occur during this recruitment/selection process. Wheneducation is a requirement for the position, official academictranscripts from the accredited college/university must besubmitted within 60 days of hire. Beginning and/or Ending Dates LocationLos Rios Community College District (District Office) Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). The Institution Additional Salary InformationNo additional salary information to note Posting Details Work YearN/A Total Hrs per Week/Day Quicklinkhttps://jobs.losrios.edu/postings/2873 Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsUnofficial Transcript 1Optional DocumentsUnofficial Transcript 2Unofficial Transcript 3Resume/Curriculum VitaeLetter of InterestLetter of Recommendation 1Letter of Recommendation 2Equivalency Determination Letter (P-38 or Equivalency RequestStatement)P-881 Report of Arrests Which Led To Convictions For CrimeDocumentForeign Transcript Evaluation Part-time, Assistant Professor Position. Adjunct pools are opencontinuously and applicants are contacted/hired year round forassignments based on college needs. Open ContinuouslyYes Assignment Responsibilities Please indicate how you meet the minimum qualifications forthis position. Select the appropriate answer.I possess the minimum qualifications for this discipline aslisted on the job announcement. (Attach unofficial transcripts froman accredited college/university and/or evidence of jobexperience.)I possess a valid California Community College Credential forthis discipline. (Attach a copy of appropriate credential withapplication.)I possess qualifications equivalent to those listed and haveattached evidence. (To review Equivalency Process.)I have previously been granted equivalency to teach thisdiscipline by the Los Rios Community College District. (Attach theEquivalency Determination Form P-38 and transcripts.) Closing Date 1. Have a bachelor’s degree AND two years of occupational and/orprofessional experience directly related to the assignment beingtaught OR have an associate’s degree AND six years of occupationaland/or professional experience directly related to the assignmentbeing taught; OR, hold a California Community College Instructor’sCredential in the discipline area; OR, the equivalent.*2. Have an equity-minded focus, responsiveness, and sensitivity toand understanding of the diverse academic, socioeconomic, cultural,disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ethnicbackgrounds of community college students, including those withphysical or learning disabilities as it relates to differences inlearning styles; and successfully foster and support an inclusiveeducational and employment environment.*Note: Applicants applying under the “equivalent” provision mustattach details and explain how their academic preparation is theequivalent of the degrees listed above. Position Summary Considering this specific position that you are applying to –where/how did you learn about this position?College DepartmentCareerBuilderChronicle of Higher Ed (Vitea.com)Community College Registry Job Fair: OaklandCommunity College Registry Job Fair: Los AngelesCommunity College Registry Online Job BoardCommunity Outreach (ex. Festivals, etc.)CommunityCollegeJobsCraigslistDiverse: Issues in Higher EducationD’Primeramano MagazineEdJoinFacebook (Campaign)Facebook (Los Rios Page)GlassdoorGreater Sacramento Urban LeagueHandshake (CSU, UC Job Boards)HigheredJobsIndeedInstagramJob SitesJob JournalLatina Leadership Network of the California CommunityCollegesLinkedInLos Rios Community College District EmployeeLos Rios Community College District Human Resources EmailLos Rios Community College District WebsiteLRCCD Resource Group – API (Asian Pacific Islander Legacy)LRCCD Resource Group – Black Faculty & Staff Association(BFSA)LRCCD Resource Group Native American Collaborative (NAC)LRCCD Resource Group – Spectrum (LGBTQIA+)Professional NetworksSacramento Black Chamber of CommerceSacramento Asian Chamber of CommerceSacramento Builders ExchangeSacramento Hispanic Chamber of CommerceSacramento Rainbow Chamber of CommerceSacramentoWorksThe HUBTwitterYouTubeZipRecruiterComunidadcenter_img AboutThe Los Rios Community College District ( LRCCD ) is the secondlargest, two-year public college district in California, servingapproximately 75,000 students in the greater Sacramento region. Thedistrict’s 2,400 square mile service area includes Sacramento andEl Dorado counties and parts of Yolo, Placer, and Solano countiesand is comprised of four uniquely diverse colleges – AmericanRiver, Cosumnes River, Folsom Lake and Sacramento City colleges. Inaddition to each college’s main campus, the district offerseducational centers in Placerville, Davis, West Sacramento, ElkGrove, Natomas and Rancho Cordova.The Los Rios district office is centrally located in the heart ofthe Sacramento valley. The growing Capital Region has strongcommunities and emergent arts and dining scenes, and is nearby someof the most celebrated tourist destinations in the country – LakeTahoe, Napa Valley, and San Francisco. The Sacramento area is agreat place to live and work!StrengthsThe district has approximately 4,000 employees throughout our fourcolleges and district office in dozens of different departmentsthat provide welcoming, inclusive, and equitable environments forLos Rios students, employees and community partners. Each and everydistrict and college department strives for the highest quality inall programs, services, and activities, and is focused on improvingeducational outcomes for the students we serve.Our VisionOur colleges offer equity-minded, academically rigorous, studentsuccess centered education. Our objective is to help our studentssuccessfully achieve their academic goals, whether they want totransfer to a four-year college or university, earn an associatedegree, or obtain one of more than 100 certificates in high demandcareer fields.The Los Rios Community College District’s Human ResourcesDepartment is committed to diversity, equity, and to ensuring aninclusive, thriving environment for all of its employees, students,and surrounding communities. To that end, the Human ResourcesDepartment is intentional in recruiting, hiring, and retainingdiverse employees, to reflect the diversity of our colleges’student populations. The Los Rios Community College District is seeking a pool ofqualified applicants for possible temporary part-time facultyteaching assignments. These positions are filled on an as neededbasis and are on-going recruitment efforts.Adjunct pools are open continuously and applicants arecontacted/hired year round for assignments based on collegeneeds.Teaching assignments may include day, evening, on-line, hybrid,weekend, and/or off campus classes. Posting Date General Responsibilities:The adjunct faculty member shall be responsible for the following:teaching assigned classes under the supervision of the area dean;helping students fulfill their maximum potential in masteringcourse content; assessing student learning outcomes; maintaining athorough and up-to-date knowledge in his/her regular teachingfield; continuing professional development; utilizing currenttechnology in the performance of job duties; maintaining standardsof professional conduct and ethics appropriate to the professionalposition; assisting with articulation and curriculum developmentand review; serving on college committees and participating infaculty governance including accreditation and studentco-curricular activities; assuming other responsibilities asassigned by the area dean; fulfilling other duties andresponsibilities of an adjunct faculty member as outlined in thecollege faculty handbook. Minimum Qualifications Please visit our Frequently Asked Questions for completeinformation on how to apply online with our District. Applicationservices are available between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mondaythrough Friday, at the Los Rios Community College District HumanResources Office located at 1919 Spanos Court, Sacramento, CA95825-3981. If you need assistance with any phase of theapplication process, please call (916) 568-3112 or come in duringour business hours. After hours inquiries to be emailed [email protected] Work Schedule Application Instructions Job Posting TitleOccupational Therapy Adjunct Assistant Professor Department Location Conditions Special Requirements How and where to apply Applicants applying to this Los Rios Community College Districtadjunct faculty posting are required to complete fully andsubmit:1. Los Rios Community College District Faculty Application(required)2. Unofficial transcripts of college/university work * (graduateadvising documents and grade reports will not be accepted asunofficial transcripts). NOTE : Los Rios employees are alsorequired to submit unofficial copies of transcripts.(required)3. Resume or Curriculum Vitae (recommended)4. Two letters of recommendation (recommended)5. Letter of Interest (recommended)*Note: Applications submitted without transcripts will bedisqualified. Also individuals who have completed college oruniversity course work at an institution in a country other thanthe United States must obtain a complete evaluation of foreigntranscripts, degrees and other relevant documents. A foreigntranscript evaluation is required any time foreign course work isused to meet minimum qualifications and/or salary placement even ifthe foreign transcript has been accepted by a college or universityin the United States.Foreign transcript evaluations ONLY accepted from AICE (Associationof International Credential Evaluations, Inc.) or NACES (TheNational Association of Credential Evaluation Services) agencies orevaluators.Foreign Degree Transcript Evaluations click hereDo not submit additional materials that are not requested. Can you perform the essential functions of this position?YesNo Criminal History Verification and Release: I acknowledge andagree that I understand that by answering the question below, Icertify that the information provided by me is true, correct andcomplete to the best of my knowledge and belief. I authorizeinvestigation of all statements contained herein, and on the P-881(if applicable and submitted), and I release from liability allpersons and organizations furnishing such information. I understandthat any misstatements, omissions or misrepresentation of facts onthis form, my application, and, if applicable, the P-881 orattachment(s) may be cause for disqualification or dismissal. Ifyou have ever been convicted of an offense other than a minortraffic violation you are required to complete the form ‘ArrestsWhich Led to Convictions for Crime’, P-881 (you must discloseconvictions that have been dismissed pursuant to Penal Code Section1203.4; Ed. Code 87008). Please copy and paste the provided URL forthe form -https://losrios.edu/docs/lrccd/employees/hr/forms/p-881.pdf – andattach the completed form to your application.Yes, I acknowledge and agreeNo, I do not acknowledge or agree Physical Demands SalaryPlease see LRCCD Salary Scheduleslast_img read more

The rise of ISIS

first_imgThe Sunni extremist group the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has waged a violent campaign in recent months, capturing large areas of territory in both countries. In June, the group declared itself a new Islamist caliphate, or formal Islamic state, and proclaimed leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi as the caliph. Experts worry about what the rise of the Jihadist group will mean for the future of Iraq, for the stability of the region, and for United States security.Political scientist Harith Hasan al-Qarawee studies state-society relations, political transitions, and identity politics in Iraq and the Middle East. The 2014-2015 Robert G. James Scholar at Risk Fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, he is working on a book titled “Transnational Sectarianism: State’s Disintegration and Sunni-Shia Divide in the Middle East.”The Gazette recently spoke with al-Qarawee about the rise of ISIS.GAZETTE: Can you describe ISIS in relationship to al-Qaeda?AL-QARAWEE: ISIS is the latest incarnation of a group called Tanẓīm Qāʻidat al-Jihād fī Bilād al-Rāfidayn, or the organization of al-Qaeda in Mesopotamia, which was formed in 2004. The group, although it declared allegiance to Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda, was a highly independent body that had organizational and ideological differences from al-Qaeda. The group adopted a very fundamentalist and exclusionary interpretation of Islam, saw itself as the only “victorious sect” in Islam, and considered Shias [Shiites, who constitute 55-60 percent of Iraqis] deviants and legitimate targets of its attacks. The group and its subsequent incarnations were shaped by the nature of conflict in Iraq that took an increasingly sectarian characteristic. Unlike al-Qaeda that prioritized the conflict with the West, ISIS deemed conflict with Shias central to its success because it sought to create a territorial state of its own. If al-Qaeda was an outcome of the conflict in Afghanistan, ISIS is an outcome of conflicts and states’ failures in Iraq and the Levant.GAZETTE: What does the rise of ISIS mean for Iraq? What does it mean for the West? Is ISIS a greater threat to United States security than al-Qaeda?AL-QARAWEE: The rise of ISIS in Iraq means that once again we are facing the failure of [the] post-colonial state in the region. Post-Saddam [Hussein] Iraq, which was supposed to become a model of democracy and inclusivity, ended up as a fragile state strongly weakened by ethnic and sectarian divides. That has something to do with both the pillars on which the current regime was established and the failed policies of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. However, to understand the roots of problem, we need to examine the unsuccessful processes of nation-building in the region. These processes have failed partly because of the exclusionary politics that characterized the behavior of all regimes that ruled Iraq, including the current one.Now, ISIS’s focus is on building its own state and consolidating its power in the areas it managed to control. Therefore, most of the fighting it has engaged in was against others who are contesting this control, and I expect this will be the case in the near future. However, as a Jihadist organization claiming to represent the true Islamic Khilafat, its project will not stop at the current borders and it will continue seeking to expand its territory, which will lead to a more direct clash with the U.S. and Western interests. As the conflict continues, ISIS might have its own internal disagreements about the future, and I expect two kinds of disputes:First, a dispute with local populations and the more indigenous groups that have their distinct concerns and priorities other than the strict interpretation of Sharia law, and this dispute is already in place in Syria and some parts of Iraq.The second conflict will be within the organization between its Iraqi wing that might prioritize the “sectarian conflict” with Shias and issues related to communal identity, and the global wing that adopts the ideology of jihad and looks beyond Iraq.GAZETTE: Do you think Iraq will split along sectarian lines, Sunni, Shia, and Kurdish? What would that kind of division mean for the United States?AL-QARAWEE: Iraq is already splitting along these lines as the Shia-dominated government loses control over Sunni areas. Apparently, neither the U.S. nor most regional powers benefit from Iraq’s disintegration because it is a formula for the creation of three fragile semi-states. This division will mean long struggles within and between the emerging entities, while regional powers such as Iran and Turkey seek to subordinate some of them. This is already happening, as the Shia groups are increasingly seeking support and protection from Iran, while Kurdistan is increasingly dependent on Turkey. Sunni areas will keep witnessing long fighting between ISIS and other groups, not to mention the fact that they will be impoverished because, unlike the south and Kurdistan, they do not have their own resources. If the U.S. recognizes that an action [is] needed to prevent this scenario, then it needs to engage more proactively and support new arrangements that help sharing and decentralizing power and leading a collective action against ISIS. Iraq needs a new compact that the Iraqi elite alone cannot reach. There is also a need to involve other regional powers in a collective action based on facing ISIS and at the same time a commitment to bridge the sectarian gap in the whole region.GAZETTE: You have said that you think the political transformation that Iraq needs in the near term is unlikely. Why?AL-QARAWEE: For those following Iraq’s news, it is obvious that, one, the current system is broken, and, two, Iraqi politicians drive a slow machine that cannot anticipate developments on the ground. Iraq lacks state-builders, which is exactly what we need today. The current crisis requires competent and confident leaders who have a clear vision and the will to make genuine concessions. Unfortunately, the current debate in Iraq is more about personalities than about institutions, and it has not elaborated any serious solutions for problems the country is facing.GAZETTE: What will the future hold for Nouri al-Maliki in Iraq? Can he form a new government that will be successful? If not, can anyone on the current political scene succeed in doing so?AL-QARAWEE: Here, I have two things to say.First, if Maliki manages to stay in power, things will only get worse. Maliki is a divisive figure in a time that requires more unity … who lacks any strategic vision for the country and has already shown authoritarian tendencies. His policies are more about his own survival than about building a state and broadening the legitimacy of his government. He belongs to a political culture that views state-building through traditional exclusionary tools such as centralization, consolidating personal power, and patronage.Second, while Maliki is a problem, he is not the only problem. Iraq suffers two chronic problems that need to be addressed.One, sectarianism has become entrenched within the system, and therefore made it difficult for any political actor to gain influence and build constituency without resorting to identity politics. We need to change the paradigm of Iraq from a country of ethnicities and sects into one based on citizenship politics. This can happen by changing the electoral law and make major amendments to the constitution.Two, Iraq depends highly on oil resources that represent about 95 percent of its governmental budget. Rentier states (which rely strongly on natural resources to thrive) tend to empower the elite and weaken civil society, which is what had happened in Iraq under the Saddam regime and is being repeated today. While it is idealistic to talk about the diversification of Iraq’s economy in the foreseeable future, there is a need to make major changes in the way oil wealth is managed. Decentralization will help prevent the accumulation of revenues in the hands of those who control the central government. But then we need to develop that further to make sure it will not create authoritarian elites in the regions.GAZETTE: Can Maliki, or someone else, form a coalition government that includes the Sunnis, making them less likely to turn to ISIS?AL-QARAWEE: The problem here is multifaceted. It is not impossible for any prime minister to give executive positions in his cabinet for Sunni politicians; in fact, this was the case under Maliki’s two terms. The problem is the belief that only by gaining executive positions, a community can feel included. This formula of distributing governmental positions among conflicting parties actually led to creating ineffective governments that lack unity and turn state’s institutions into fiefdoms of conflicting parties. This is exactly what made Maliki popular among Iraqi Shias, because his program focused on forming a majority government rather than apportioning cabinet positions among political parties. Iraq needs decentralization rather than building a grand central government. In addition, Sunni political elites are facing today an existential crisis after ISIS has driven most of its members outside their constituencies. So, assuming that ISIS will be forced out of the cities it is controlling now, there will be a need to recognize who are the genuine representatives of Sunni communities. I think a change within the Sunni political spectrum is inevitable.GAZETTE: What does the rise of ISIS mean for women in Syria and Iraq?AL-QARAWEE: More strict measures and marginalization. These groups consider women objects and deny them any existence as social actors. It is important to recognize that Islamic fundamentalism is a powerful ideology in these societies and it has “indoctrinated” many women to accept their lower social status. As the groups consolidate their control in these areas, they follow a very strict version of Sharia law, while trying to strengthen their cultural hegemony through tools of socialization. Today, the situation of women in the Arab world, and areas of conflict in particular, is clear evidence of the failure in the traditional approaches of modernization and development. In sociological terms, ISIS is the outcome of this failure, and its ideology represents a regression from any previous achievements. This is important to highlight in order to clarify that military means only cannot secure victory against ISIS and its like.last_img read more

England players to challenge in France

first_img23 Jun 2016 England players to challenge in France Will Enefer, James Walker and Jack Yule will head to France next month to represent England in two prestigious stroke play events. The Chiberta Grand Prix takes place from 7-10 July and the Biarritz Cup will be played from 14-17 July. The players: Will Enefer, 18, (Wrekin, Shropshire) reached the last 32 in the Amateur Championship and has had top tens in the Welsh and Irish stroke play championships and the Berkhamsted Trophy. He was an U18 international. (Image © Leaderboard Photography). James Walker, 22, (The Oaks, Yorkshire) made his England debut in the recent international against France, helping the team to victory. He was sixth in the Lytham Trophy and ninth in the Welsh stroke play. Jack Yule, 21, (Middleton Hall, Norfolk) also reached the last 32 at the Amateur. He was runner up in the Italian international, eighth in the Hampshire Salver and ninth in the Portuguese amateur.last_img read more

TRIPLE CROWN CHAMPION AMERICAN PHAROAH TO RETURN HOME TO SANTA ANITA ON THURSDAY; BAFFERT TRAINEE TO FLY FROM LOUISVILLE TO ONTARIO VIA TEX SUTTON CHARTER

first_imgLAW ENFORCEMENT TO ESCORT CHAMP FROM AIRPORT TO SANTA ANITA’S BARN 5 ARCADIA, Calif. (June 15, 2015)–Twelve days after providing one of the most dramatic moments in racing history, Triple Crown Champion American Pharoah will return home to Santa Anita on Thursday, June 18. Owned and bred by Ahmed Zayat and trained by Santa Anita-based Bob Baffert, American Pharoah is due to arrive from Louisville via Tex Sutton charter at Ontario International Airport at approximately 10 a.m., and he will then be vanned with a six-unit law enforcement escort to The Great Race Place, with an estimated time of arrival of 11:30 a.m.“Along with the rest of the country, we were in awe of American Pharoah’s performance in the Belmont last Saturday and we’re honored to be able to welcome him back home here to Santa Anita,” said Keith Brackpool, Santa Anita Chairman. “We’d like to congratulate Mr. Zayat, Bob Baffert and Victor Espinoza on winning America’s first Triple Crown in 37 years and we want to thank them for sharing this magnificent horse with all of us.”Ridden by Victor Espinoza, the 3-year-old colt by Pioneerof the Nile won Santa Anita’s Grade I FrontRunner Stakes on Sept. 27 and was subsequently sidelined due to a foot injury, causing him to miss the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile on Nov. 1.Headquartered at Baffert’s Barn 5 over the fall and winter, American Pharoah began his assault on the elusive Triple Crown with his first recorded breeze on Feb. 4, a crisp three furlong move in 36.20. Under Baffert’s stewardship, “Pharoah” would go on to register a total of six Santa Anita works prior to taking the Grade II Rebel Stakes by 6 ¼ lengths at Oaklawn Park on March 14.In all, American Pharoah had eight works at his Santa Anita base in advance of winning the first leg in the Triple Crown, the Kentucky Derby, on May 2.“From day one, we couldn’t miss any time with him,” said Baffert this past Wednesday morning. “We went three eighths, three eighths, five eighths…We hit every mark and he just thrived. The timing of everything was perfect.”American Pharoah will be greeted by his trainer and jockey, along with an anticipated throng of invited media at the Baffert Barn upon his arrival Thursday. It is also expected that the Triple Crown Champ will parade for the public on Santa Anita’s main track between races on June 27.last_img read more