Gigastack project partners secure $9m funding for phase two programme

first_imgThe Gigastack second phase includes a front end engineering design (FEED) study for a 100MW electrolyser system Consortium awarded $9m funding for Gigastack hydrogen project. (Credit: Ørsted.) A consortium including ITM Power, Ørsted, Phillips 66 and Element Energy has been awarded a £7.5m funding for the next phase of Gigastack, a low-cost, zero-carbon hydrogen project in the UK.The funding for the renewable hydrogen project being has been provided as part of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Hydrogen supply competition.Ørsted hydrogen vice president Anders Christian Nordstrøm said: “Creating renewable hydrogen with offshore wind really has the potential to decarbonise industrial processes, and what is needed now is to scale up the electrolyser technology and bring the cost down. We’ve seen this happen in offshore wind.“With industry and government working together, there has been a rapid deployment and a huge cost reduction. This project aims to do the same with hydrogen. At the right cost, this technology has the potential to play a huge role in meeting the UK’s decarbonisation targets.”Gigastack project will identify challenges for renewable hydrogen systemsThe initial phase of the Gigastack project, which was completed in 2019, utilised low-cost modular 5MW electrolyser ‘stack’ designs, developed by ITM Power, which has partnered with Ørsted to explore business models for the first industrial-scale 100MW electrolysers.In the second phase of the project, a front end engineering design (FEED) study is planned to be conducted on a 100MW electrolyser system using staged installations with a nominal capacity of 20MW.The FEED study will feature a design of hydrogen production system connected to wind farm and industrial off-taker using ITM Power’s new generation of electrolyser stack technology, renewable energy directly from Ørsted’s Hornsea Two offshore wind farm.The resulting renewable hydrogen will be supplied to an industrial off-taker, Phillips 66’s Humber Refinery.Phillips 66 UK lead executive and Humber Refinery general manager Darren Cunningham said: “This project aligns with our record of developing new low-carbon markets within the UK and worldwide, following our innovative technologies, which are key to lithium-ion battery production and, more recently, our biofuels produced from used cooking oil.“The Humber region is uniquely positioned within the UK for the large-scale deployment of renewable hydrogen. Direct access to existing offshore wind power and a developed industrial base with hydrogen demand at Phillips 66 Limited’s Humber Refinery provides an ideal opportunity to develop a new renewable hydrogen market where the feedstocks are just water and renewable power.”last_img read more

Faculty Senate debates classroom policies, disability services

first_imgStudent behavior during class, disability services and a new master’s program sparked debate in Faculty Senate this semester, chair Morten Eskildsen said. Eskildsen said the group acts as a voice for faculty interests on campus. “We work in two ways — first as a reactionary to initiatives, proposals or anything that changes across campus that would affect faculty and secondly as a proactive group to address issues we feel could be improved,” Eskildsen said. Faculty Senate met only twice this semester due to the death of former chair J. Keith Rigby, Jr., Eskildsen said. Rigby, an associate professor of civil engineering and geological sciences, died Nov. 5. Eskildsen said he cancelled the group’s November meeting in honor of Rigby. Generally the Faculty Senate meets once every month. Within the Senate are four committees — Academic Affairs, Administrative Affairs, Benefits and Student Affairs. Two students also sit on Faculty Senate as non-voting members. Ellen Childs represented graduate students, and student body vice president Brett Rocheleau spoke for undergraduates. The faculty representatives discussed disruptive student behavior during its meetings this semester. Eskildsen said the use of cell phones and laptops during class concerns some faculty members. Some professors also expressed frustration with tardiness and students who left during class, he said. “The first thing is then to do some fact finding and find out to which degree this is a real issue,” Eskildsen said. “Some people have expressed this concern on one committee, but it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s widespread.” Rocheleau said he hoped to work with the committee to solve any issues professors had with students’ behavior in class. “Talk about it and tell us,” Rocheleau said. “If a professor puts it in a syllabus, we know. Some professors agree with some points [on student behavior] but I don’t see how anything would be achieved by a study, which some faculty want to do.” The student representatives made a list of seven initiatives that could possibly improve student-faculty relations, Rocheleau said. The seven initiatives included developing graduate student committees, improved graduate housing, reform in graduate health care, provision of teaching opportunities to graduate students, achieving balance in faculty’s academic and home lives, the creation of an online syllabus database and updating disability services. Disability services have been a large topic of discussion in the group this semester, Rocheleau said. Eskildsen said the Faculty Senate worried the services did not fulfill the needs of those students. “We have an office that provides services for anyone with a physical or learning disability, but it would seem it is understaffed,” Eskildsen said. “Some teachers even take it on themselves and go way beyond what preparation for class should be to help remove obstacles in their way.” Another item on the Senate’s agenda has been a proposal for a master’s degree in Patent Law, which would be a part of the College of Science. “The Faculty Senate is asked for input when new programs are proposed,” he said. “The Academic Affairs Committee is looking into this one.” In addition to these issues, the Faculty Senate also planned to reassess faculty benefits, Eskildsen said. “Hopefully in our [next] meeting , [director of compensation and benefits] Denise Murphy will brief us on some of the latest developments relating to retirement savings and those programs,” he said. “The Committee on Benefits monitors what is going on and advocates for the faculty.” No matter the topic of discussion, Eskildsen said the main goal of the group this semester was to resolve issues on behalf of the faculty. “We try not to just point out problems, though it is necessary,” he said. “We want to offer constructive solutions as to how things could improve.”last_img read more