Over Rs 1L seized from Bharati Ghoshs car at West Midnapore

first_imgKolkata: More than one lakh rupees was seized from former IPS officer Bharati Ghosh’s car late on Thursday night at Pingla in West Midnapore, where election is scheduled to be held on Sunday.According to sources, on Thursday night at around 10:45 pm, Ghosh was returning from election campaign in a car bearing registration number WB 02 AG 6684. It was intercepted in a naka-checking point at Mundumari in Pingla. It has been alleged that despite repeated instructions by police officials, Ghosh refused to stop and let her car be checked. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataImmediately, senior police and Election Commission officials were informed and after a few kilometres near Mondalbari, Ghosh’s car was intercepted again. This time the car was thoroughly checked and sleuths found Rs 1,13,000 from the vehicle. According to the rules and regulations of an election, a candidate can carry a maximum Rs 50,000, along with proper documents. As Ghosh was carrying more than the stipulated amount, she violated the norms. Police seized the money and asked Ghosh to sign on the seizure list, which she denied. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateShe claimed that she had around Rs 49,000 and the rest of the amount belonged to other passengers of the car. Ghosh alleged that police personnel had asked them to put the money in one bag, which was later seized and shown as her money. According to sources, at the time of search and seizure, Ghosh got involved in an altercation with the police personnel. She demanded that all others inside the car must be allowed to sign on the seizure list as well, as their money had also been seized. Ghosh was later detained and taken to the police station for questioning. Almost after three hours at around 2 am, she was released. On Friday, police lodged a complaint and initiated an FIR against her. The information of Thursday night’s incident was also conveyed to the Election Commission in the state. On Friday afternoon, information was forwarded to the Election Commission of India for necessary action.last_img read more

5 Ways We Have Changed During Ubers 7 Years of Business

first_img Though Uber has weathered a number of controversies this year, ranging from the legality of its practices to the toxicity of its company culture, there is no denying that the company, which turns seven today, has had a significant effect on the worlds of transportation, technology and business. Read on for how it has changed our perspective over the past seven years.Our understanding of employment One of the main controversies that the company has weathered is in regard to how to classifies the people it employs and how that differs across the world. In October of 2016, a U.K. court ruled that Uber drivers were employees, not contractors. However, the outcome of two class action lawsuits in California in April of 2016 found that the company could classify drivers as independent contractors.Related: Before You Delete Your Account, Uber Wants You to Know It’s ‘Deeply Hurting’The rise of the gig economyA recent study conducted by McKinsey found that 20 to 30 percent of the working age population in the United States and Europe are involved in some form of independent work, due in large part to the ability to connect customers with services through digital platforms such as apps that companies like Uber live on.How we talk about on demand In Uber’s wake, a number of on-demand oriented startups have used the company to explain what they do to potential customers and investor. The Uber for X has been applied to everything from grocery and flower delivery to laundry and grooming services.Related: 7 Times Uber Has Tracked PeopleThe way we think about ownershipThe company doesn’t own its fleet of vehicles. The cars belong to the drivers the company employs. In that same vein, in recent years Uber introduced several lease programs for its drivers. Kalanick has said in the past that a company goal is to reduce the number of cars on the road.What we consider successLed by Uber, the last few years have seen a major boom — particularly in 2015 — and subsequent dropping off of venture capital investment in on-demand companies. And while Uber has been valued at $70 billion, as of the winter of 2017, it was not yet profitable.  2 min read Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now May 31, 2017center_img Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.last_img read more

SAS says 6 day pilot strike cost it 68 million

first_img COPENHAGEN — Scandinavian Airlines says that a six-day pilot strike that led to the cancellation of 4,000 flights and affected more than 370,000 passengers cost 650 million kronor ($68 million).SAS says that the walkout, which ended May 2 when the sides reached a three-year collective bargaining agreement, “negatively impacted” its second quarter, for which it reported a 1.2-billion kronor ($125 million) loss.CEO Richard Gustafson says it “added to the challenges already faced by SAS,” which include tough competition, increasing fuel prices and a weakening Swedish currency.Gustafson said Tuesday the result for the three-month period that ended April 30, “is far from satisfying.”The strike started April 26 after talks collapsed between the airline and SAS Pilot Group, which represents 95% of the company’s pilots in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. << Previous PostNext Post >> SAS says 6 day pilot strike cost it $68 million Share By: The Associated Press Tuesday, May 28, 2019 Tags: Scandinavian Airlineslast_img read more