Tim Weah- President’s son with big football boots to fill

first_imgHe admits his father is on a “pedestal”, but he hasn’t let the pressure affect a burgeoning career for Paris Saint-Germain and the United States, co-host of the World Cup in 2026, when he will be 26.After standing out at junior level, American-born Weah netted his first senior international goal in May, and got off the mark for PSG — where his father starred in the 1990s — this month against Bayern Munich.“When I’m out there, it’s just me and the ball and my teammates and that’s all I really care about,” he said, after catching the eye in Saturday’s 5-1 pre-season defeat to Arsenal in Singapore.“The name on my back, I don’t really see it, it’s the fans that are seeing it. So no pressure, I just try to play my game.”– ‘Complete banger’ –Early indications are good for the centre-forward, who is strong and skillful, fast, astute, and has an eye for goal — and his father’s knack for the spectacular.Tim Weah’s father, George, was sworn as Liberia’s president in January © AFP/File / ISSOUF SANOGOWhile he hasn’t dribbled from his own penalty box to score, as his father famously did against Verona in 1996, Weah did hit a screamer during his hat-trick against Paraguay at last year’s Under-17 World Cup, a goal he accurately describes as a “complete banger”.On Saturday, Weah twice came close to scoring for a youthful PSG side, and earned the penalty that brought their only goal when he drew a foul from Sead Kolasinac.But he says he is happy to bide his time and wait for opportunities at star-studded PSG, where he can learn from the fearsome strike force of Neymar, Kylian Mbappe and Edinson Cavani.“With this type of player, I just learn maturity, just be comfortable on the ball and be yourself out there, because no one can take that from you,” Weah said.“I watch these players all the time. At the World Cup I was watching them and I took some stuff from their games as far as being confident, being skillful (is concerned).”Beyond his own development, there is another goal in sight for Weah, a proud American who wants to use the skills he learns in Paris to bring his country success.“Being from America, I play with a lot of heart, that’s one thing that we Americans have and that’s what I try to do and give out there on the pitch every day,” he said.As his career surges, Weah said he is getting “great advice” from both his father and his mother. But he stresses that any achievements on the pitch are all his own.“I still watch his videos, I try to take something from it but the game that you guys see out there is all me,” he said.“That’s all the stuff that I’ve worked on over the years. I’m almost there but I’ve got to keep pushing, I’ve got to keep working hard and we’ll see where this season takes me.”0Shares0000(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Timothy Weah, son of Liberian president and football legend George, scored his first goal for Paris Saint-Germain against Bayern Munich © AFP / Jure MakovecSINGAPORE, Singapore, Jul 29 – It isn’t easy when your father is footballing royalty — and the president of Liberia to boot. But for 18-year-old Tim Weah, son of the legendary player-turned-politician George, having a famous name on his shirt isn’t proving a hindrance.Weah wasn’t even born during his father’s playing career, which included the 1995 Ballon d’Or and one of the greatest goals in history, for AC Milan — which he now watches on YouTube.last_img read more

Take a Forest Bath

first_imgScience supports a Japanese tradition of “forest bathing” for mental refreshment and overall well-being.“Have you ever wondered why you feel healthier and happier when you stroll through the trees or frolic by the sea?”, an entry in Medical Xpress begins. The answer is not just in the beauty. It’s in beneficial substances, including bacteria, that we inhale in outdoor environments. Japanese scientists traveled to the island of Yakushima, famous for its forests and mountains, to study the practice of “forest bathing” that gives a sense of well being. “The Japanese researchers suggested that we are taking in beneficial substances when we breathe forest air.” Aren’t bacteria our enemies? A few are, but here’s what the article proposes:Research has identified three major inhaled factors that can make us feel healthier. These factors are beneficial bacteria, plant-derived essential oils and negatively-charged ions.From birth to the grave, beneficial bacteria surround us; they live in the environment and, importantly, in the air we breathe. We also share almost our entire body with them. The more interaction we have with them, the happier and healthier we are.If you can’t get outside where the ecology benefits you directly, you can get some benefit from it just by looking out the window. Another article on Medical Xpress says a study found that “views of green space help students perform better”. Students did better on tests when they could see green landscapes out the window, perhaps because it reduces stress.Take it from me; outdoor walks have done wonders for my health after cancer surgery three years ago. I walked 1,000 miles outdoors in 2015 and might break that record this year. I know a pastor that takes outdoor walks as a form of his own personal Sabbath, not as a theological requirement, but as a time for quiet reflection with God. It really helped him after he recovered from cancer, too. Don’t wait for a bad diagnosis. Build healthy habits into your life. It’s a way of saying “Thank you Lord!” for the incomparable body and mind the Creator has given each of us to use on God’s green Earth.(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Study implicates global warming as a factor in increasing economic losses due

first_img Geographer says, expect weather severity to increase Explore further Citation: Study implicates global warming as a factor in increasing economic losses due to hurricanes (2015, October 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-10-implicates-global-factor-economic-losses.html (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers affiliated with Universidad Nacional Autónoma in Mexico, and VU University in the Netherlands, has conducted a study on the source of an increase in property dollar amounts lost over the past several decades due to hurricanes and has concluded that it cannot be blamed on an increase in wealth or construction—instead, they suggest in their paper published in Nature Geoscience, that it is due to more storms, because of global warming. Stéphane Hallegatte with the Climate Change Policy Team at the World Bank, offers a News & Views piece in the same journal edition on the work done by the team, outlining the process that was used, and highlighting possible problems with the results. © 2015 Phys.org More information: Francisco Estrada et al. Economic losses from US hurricanes consistent with an influence from climate change, Nature Geoscience (2015). DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2560AbstractWarming of the climate system and its impacts on biophysical and human systems have been widely documented. The frequency and intensity of extreme weather events have also changed, but the observed increases in natural disaster losses are often thought to result solely from societal change, such as increases in exposure and vulnerability. Here we analyse the economic losses from tropical cyclones in the United States, using a regression-based approach instead of a standard normalization procedure to changes in exposure and vulnerability, to minimize the chance of introducing a spurious trend. Unlike previous studies, we use statistical models to estimate the contributions of socioeconomic factors to the observed trend in losses and we account for non-normal and nonlinear characteristics of loss data. We identify an upward trend in economic losses between 1900 and 2005 that cannot be explained by commonly used socioeconomic variables. Based on records of geophysical data, we identify an upward trend in both the number and intensity of hurricanes in the North Atlantic basin as well as in the number of loss-generating tropical cyclone records in the United States that is consistent with the smoothed global average rise in surface air temperature. We estimate that, in 2005, US$2 to US$14 billion of the recorded annual losses could be attributable to climate change, 2 to 12% of that year’s normalized losses. We suggest that damages from tropical cyclones cannot be dismissed when evaluating the current and future costs of climate change and the expected benefits of mitigation and adaptation strategies.center_img Monetary losses that come about due to natural disasters are on the rise, particularly from storms such as hurricanes—that much is clear. What is not clear is whether this trend can be blamed on changes in the weather or people building more expensive stuff in the path of such storms. Some recent studies have found that it is mostly the latter, but that, the researchers with this new effort argue, is because the approach used to reach such conclusions was flawed.The traditional way of normalizing damage from hurricanes, Hallegatte explains, involves an approach where it is assumed that an increase in damage would come about evenly with an increase in wealth—i.e. doubling wealth in an area would double the damage costs that occurred in it. But that thinking is flawed, the researchers contend, because it does not take into consideration the fact that as an area grows more wealthy, some of that money is used to prevent storm damage. They conducted their own study using a method that took such changes into account and their results showed that the economic loss increases due to hurricanes over the period 1900 to 2005 could not be solely attributed to an increase in wealth—they suggest that the other increase was due to an increased number of storms and stronger intensity (due to global warming) and further suggest that between 2 and 12 percent of losses due to such storms in the year 2005 alone (the year Katrina struck New Orleans), could be attributed to global warming.Hallegatte agrees with the approach used by the researchers but points out that the change used to normalize the data is not proven, nor is the assumption that an increase in the number of storms, or their intensity can be blamed on global warming. Hurricane Isabel (2003) as seen from orbit during Expedition 7 of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA Journal information: Nature Geoscience This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more