Tix Now Available to See Jessica Lange & More in Long Day’s Journey Into Night

first_imgTickets are now on sale to see Oscar and Emmy winner Jessica Lange, Oscar nominee Michael Shannon, Tony winner John Gallagher Jr. and Tony nominee Gabriel Byrne in Long Day’s Journey Into Night.Directed by Jonathan Kent, the Roundabout production of Eugene O’Neill’s classic will play a limited engagement at Broadway’s American Airlines Theatre from March 31, 2016 through June 26. Opening night is set for April 19.Long Day’s Journey Into Night is the tale of an ordinary summer’s day with extraordinary consequences. Drawing so heavily from the author’s personal history that it could only be produced posthumously, the story centers on the Tyrones, a dysfunctional family with a drug-addicted mother, penny-pinching father and two troubled sons. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 26, 2016 Related Shows Star Files Michael Shannon Long Day’s Journey Into Night View Commentslast_img read more

Cotton Breeding

first_imgUniversity of Georgia cotton breeder Peng Chee’s groundbreaking research in molecular genetics provides Georgia cotton farmers with root-knot-nematode-resistant cotton varieties. It also garnered Chee national recognition in January, when he was awarded the 2016 Cotton Genetics Research Award during the 2017 Beltwide Cotton Improvement Conference in Dallas.Chee, a professor in UGA’s Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, identified nematode resistance as a top priority when he started working on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2000.“Host-plant-resistance research has been a high priority in my lab,” Chee said. “We were the first group to identify the genes involved in providing resistance to root-knot nematode in cotton.”Chee published the genome location of the resistant genes in 2006, and private breeding companies now use this knowledge to develop a selection system to transfer the resistant genes into elite cotton varieties. Ten years later, there are now numerous nematode-resistance varieties available to cotton growers.If infected by microscopic southern root-knot nematodes, cotton roots swell in response. The knots serve as feeding sites where the nematodes grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant’s growth.Breeding for resistance to nematodes increased in importance when some of the chemical treatment options that Georgia farmers used to combat the nematodes were slowly phased out. The Coastal Plain region is a hotbed for southern root-knot nematodes in cotton, Chee said. Depending on the year and environmental conditions, Georgia cotton crops could be vulnerable to a significant outbreak of nematodes.Using nematode-resistant varieties might be the best course of action for some farmers, especially since about 70 percent of Georgia’s cotton fields are infested.In addition to the nematode research, Chee’s work in the UGA Molecular Cotton Breeding Laboratory has centered on fiber quality, a trait he considers essential if the U.S. cotton industry is to compete with other cotton-producing countries and, more importantly, with synthetic fibers. One of the main goals of Chee’s lab is to explore wild cotton to identify fiber-quality genes currently not in the domesticated germplasm and to breed them into cotton varieties adapted for Georgia.“The whole approach to cotton breeding has changed a lot in the last two decades. When I first started working at the Tifton Campus, cotton genomics was still in its infancy,” Chee said. “Our goal at the time was to develop a genomic toolbox for cotton breeders. I believe we are now starting to see new cotton varieties being developed through the use of these tools.”While Chee’s work has been successful, he can’t help but think about the future of genetic research and where it could lead over the next decade.“This is an exciting time to be in the field of cotton breeding and genomics. I have witnessed cotton breeding, transitioning from traditional phenotypic selection to selection of progeny based on what genes they carry by using DNA markers. The complete genome sequence of cotton has greatly accelerated our understanding of the genetic control of economically important traits such as insect and disease resistance as well as fiber yield and quality,” Chee said. “I suspect the next two decades will see a broad application of genomics in cotton breeding.”For more information about the research conducted in the UGA Molecular Cotton Breeding Laboratory, see www.nespal.org/peng_lab.last_img read more

White House accused of cover-up amid whistleblower scandal

first_imgMaguire, who was grilled for three hours during Thursday’s House hearing, stood by how he handled the whistleblower complaint.“My integrity has never been questioned until now,” Maguire said Thursday.But Democrats including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are now accusing the White House of a cover-up.Pelosi said Thursday Maguire “broke the law” by not turning the complaint over to Congress.While Democrats are convinced of an alleged Trump administration cover-up, Republicans including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Vice President Mike Pence are reportedly outraged at their latest attempt to “reverse the 2016 presidential election.”As of now, the identity of the whistleblower. and the current status of the impeachment investigation remain unknown.This story is developing. Tensions amongst Democrat and Republican lawmakers are at an ultimate high in the wake of the whistleblower scandal.This week Democrats launched an impeachment inquiry after news broke of a whistleblower complaint regarding a phone call between President Trump and the Ukrainian president.The complaint alleges that Trump abused his official powers “to solicit interference” from Ukraine in the upcoming 2020 election, and the White House took steps to cover it up.President Trump confirmed the phone call but denied any wrongdoing in the matter slamming Democrats for creating another “Witch Hunt.”On Wednesday, the White House released the full, unredacted transcript of the conversation.Following the release of the documents, the Department of Justice found that President Trump did not break the law.On Thursday, the Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire testified before a congressional intelligence committee about the recently released whistleblower complaint.Related content:WATCH Live: DNI Testifying On Capitol Hill, Whistleblower Complaint Herelast_img read more

UPMC gets $300K concussion study grant from NFL

first_imgIn this Nov. 9, 2013, file photo, former Pittsburgh and NFL Hall of Fame running back Tony Dorsett stands on the sideline before the start of an NCAA football game between Pittsburgh and Notre Dame in Pittsburgh. Dorsett is one of more than 4,500 former players that have filed suit, some accusing the NFL football league of fraud for its handling of concussions. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)PITTSBURGH (AP) — The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center is one of 16 organizations receiving $300,000 each for research on better diagnosing and treating concussions, in a National Football League program sponsored by General Electric.UPMC’s grant was among the winners of the first stage of the $20 million Head Health Challenge, announced Thursday at NFL headquarters in New York. Up to six of the groups given grants will receive an additional half a million dollars next year, if their work is deemed worthy of more study.UPMC plans to use the money to determine if a process known as high-definition fiber tracking can be used to diagnose concussions.The technology, developed by Walter Schneider, a Pitt professor of psychology and neurological surgery, could help doctors identify concussions and more clearly determine when an athlete is healed and can resume playing sports.“This technology gives us the ability to see the damage so we hope to track its recovery,” Schneider said. “In the same way X-rays let us track a fracture or look at the healing process, we expect to see these broken brain cables and look at their healing.”So far, the technology has been used to diagnose and treat more serious brain injuries, like tumors or the brains of wounded soldiers. The technology paints a picture of injured fiber tracts in the human brain, which are composed of billions of tiny neural connections, using yellow, green and purple images.Schneider and the other UPMC researchers are hopeful that the color-coded images can be used to identify less traumatic brain injuries, like concussions. That’s important because the risk for more serious, long-term brain damage is greater if someone is re-injured before a concussion heals.Injuries to the brain-cell network don’t typically show up on MRIs or CT scans, which are currently used to determine whether athletes have suffered concussions.The league has been under pressure for its handling of concussions, with thousands of former players filing suit and a federal judge in Philadelphia weighing whether to approve a proposed $765 million settlement meant to compensate players who’ve suffered complications from concussions.To determine whether Schneider’s high-definition fiber tracking can identify concussions, UPMC will study 50 athletes ages 13 to 28 within a week of them seeking treatment for head injuries.Michael Collins, director of UPMC’s concussion program and one of the study’s principle researchers, said if the study pans out as hoped, UPMC would become the first program to use imaging technology to treat concussions.“It doesn’t mean it’s going to work, but it’s a great place to start,” Collins said. “That’s why we do the research.”last_img read more