Cotton Breeding

first_imgUniversity of Georgia cotton breeder Peng Chee’s groundbreaking research in molecular genetics provides Georgia cotton farmers with root-knot-nematode-resistant cotton varieties. It also garnered Chee national recognition in January, when he was awarded the 2016 Cotton Genetics Research Award during the 2017 Beltwide Cotton Improvement Conference in Dallas.Chee, a professor in UGA’s Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, identified nematode resistance as a top priority when he started working on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2000.“Host-plant-resistance research has been a high priority in my lab,” Chee said. “We were the first group to identify the genes involved in providing resistance to root-knot nematode in cotton.”Chee published the genome location of the resistant genes in 2006, and private breeding companies now use this knowledge to develop a selection system to transfer the resistant genes into elite cotton varieties. Ten years later, there are now numerous nematode-resistance varieties available to cotton growers.If infected by microscopic southern root-knot nematodes, cotton roots swell in response. The knots serve as feeding sites where the nematodes grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant’s growth.Breeding for resistance to nematodes increased in importance when some of the chemical treatment options that Georgia farmers used to combat the nematodes were slowly phased out. The Coastal Plain region is a hotbed for southern root-knot nematodes in cotton, Chee said. Depending on the year and environmental conditions, Georgia cotton crops could be vulnerable to a significant outbreak of nematodes.Using nematode-resistant varieties might be the best course of action for some farmers, especially since about 70 percent of Georgia’s cotton fields are infested.In addition to the nematode research, Chee’s work in the UGA Molecular Cotton Breeding Laboratory has centered on fiber quality, a trait he considers essential if the U.S. cotton industry is to compete with other cotton-producing countries and, more importantly, with synthetic fibers. One of the main goals of Chee’s lab is to explore wild cotton to identify fiber-quality genes currently not in the domesticated germplasm and to breed them into cotton varieties adapted for Georgia.“The whole approach to cotton breeding has changed a lot in the last two decades. When I first started working at the Tifton Campus, cotton genomics was still in its infancy,” Chee said. “Our goal at the time was to develop a genomic toolbox for cotton breeders. I believe we are now starting to see new cotton varieties being developed through the use of these tools.”While Chee’s work has been successful, he can’t help but think about the future of genetic research and where it could lead over the next decade.“This is an exciting time to be in the field of cotton breeding and genomics. I have witnessed cotton breeding, transitioning from traditional phenotypic selection to selection of progeny based on what genes they carry by using DNA markers. The complete genome sequence of cotton has greatly accelerated our understanding of the genetic control of economically important traits such as insect and disease resistance as well as fiber yield and quality,” Chee said. “I suspect the next two decades will see a broad application of genomics in cotton breeding.”For more information about the research conducted in the UGA Molecular Cotton Breeding Laboratory, see www.nespal.org/peng_lab.last_img read more

Dowling College Oakdale Campus Sold for $26M

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A bankruptcy judge approved the sale of defunct Dowling College’s historic waterfront Oakdale campus for $26.5 million to a private school this week.Judge Robert Grossman, who presides in Central Islip federal court, approved the sale to Princeton Education Center LLC. The company, which last week won an auction for the property, plans to open a bilingual K-12 school, The Associated Press reported.The 25-acre Oakdale campus was built on the former William Kissam Vanderbilt estate overlooking the Connetquot River. The college also had a 105-acre campus in Shirley that will be sold separately.Proceeds from the sales will be used to pay the $54 million in debt that the college accrued before the 48-year-old institution lost its accreditation, laid off nearly 500 professors and forced almost 2,000 students to transfer last summer. The college filed for bankruptcy last fall. Dowling, which blamed rising debt and declining enrollment for its closure, was one of several private nonprofit colleges nationwide to recently shutter.Locally, Briarcliffe College, a small for-profit college with campuses in Bethpage and Patchogue, announced last year that it’s closing in 2018. Its Patchogue campus is slated to become the new home of the Blue Point Brewing Co.The sale of Dowling’s main campus is one of two major college property transactions in Oakdale in recent months. Queens-based St. John’s University sold its 170-acre Oakdale campus for $22.4 million last year to nonprofit Amity University, a private nonprofit education group with schools worldwide.last_img read more