Ryan Harris, Mike Hussey join Australia support staff for Sri Lanka, Pakistan series

first_imgRyan Harris, Mike Hussey join Australia support staff for Sri Lanka, Pakistan seriesFormer middle-order batsman Mike Hussey has been roped in by Australian coach Justin Langer to help mentor the side during their upcoming Twenty20 series against Sri Lanka and Pakistan.advertisement Reuters SydneyOctober 20, 2019UPDATED: October 20, 2019 16:47 IST Australia former batsman Mike Hussey (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSMike Hussey said he was also being looked at for a role in the T20 World Cup in Australia next yearFormer Australia fast bowler Ryan Harris comes in as bowling coachAustralia open their home summer with the first of three T20s against Sri Lanka in Adelaide on Oct. 27Mike Hussey and Ryan Harris will join Australia’s backroom staff for the Twenty20 international series against Sri Lanka and Pakistan, Cricket Australia said on Sunday.Former test batsman Hussey said he was also being looked at for a role in the T20 World Cup in Australia next year.”I’m very excited actually. I’m really looking forward to getting back in around the Aussie team,” 44-year-old Hussey, who played 38 T20 internationals for Australia, told News Ltd media.”They have floated the possibility of being involved closer to the T20 World Cup as well, but it’s all pretty loose at the moment.”Former Australia fast bowler Harris comes in as bowling coach, stepping away from his usual role at Australia’s National Cricket Centre academy in Brisbane.He replaces Troy Cooley, who coached the bowlers during Australia’s Ashes victory over England.The appointments continue head coach Justin Langer’s use of short-term assistants following the resignation of bowling coach David Saker in the last home summer.Former captain Ricky Ponting was brought in as a consultant during Australia’s run to the World Cup semi-finals in England.”I can’t tell you how influential these guys can be on the group,” Langer said on Cricket Australia’s website.”It’s about building our leadership, about honing their skills as cricketers, and they can just complement the other guys who are full-time coaches.”Australia open their home summer with the first of three T20s against Sri Lanka in Adelaide on Oct. 27 before hosting Pakistan in three T20s from Nov. 3.advertisementAlso Read | Ranchi Test: Rohit Sharma joins birthday boy Virender Sehwag in elite listAlso see:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byNitin Kumar Tags :Follow Ryan HarrisFollow Mike Hussey Nextlast_img read more

Hamilton carding policy

The police practice of carding, where an officer randomly stops an individual to collect information, has recently been under fire by the public. Following new provincial laws to change how the practice should be conducted, Hamilton Police are asking the community for their thoughts.Some Hamiltonians who are part of visual minorities have become all too familiar with random police carding, but public backlash over the practice has seen Hamilton Police carding numbers plummet from over 1400 in 2013 down to 30 in 2015.In accordance to a new provincial law that aims to improve public trust in police, the Hamilton Police board released a 6 page draft outlining the force’s new regulations to street checks. The policy starts by pledging that checks won’t be random or racially based. Police will be expected to hand citizens a receipt that includes their name, badge number and contact information. Lastly, an annual report will detail who exactly was questioned. The chair of the Community Coalition Against Racism, Ken Stone, says this is a step forward.Stone added that he’d also like to see a citizen group release their own yearly report as well. He also thinks there are still some concerns with the new policies citing that there are ‘about 6 loopholes in the document’. In it, police don’t have to explain why they stopped someone if: it compromises an active investigation or puts someone’s safety at risk.If that doesn’t sit well, police want your feedback. read more