Govt urged to deal swiftly with Clifton oil pollution

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNearly six months after the government announced it would spend $10 million on oil spill remediation efforts, petrochemical pollution remains a serious threat to the sensitive marine environment throughout The Bahamas, but particularly at Clifton Bay, environmentalists say.Vanessa Haley-Benjamin, CEO of fast-growing social and environmental movement Save The Bays (STB), said recent complaints from divers visiting the Sir Nicholas Nuttall Coral Reef Sculpture Gardens, who emerged from the water covered in oil, prove that whatever actions have been taken to date have been far from sufficient.“We appreciate the government’s recognition that oil pollution in Clifton Bay is an issue that needs attention,” she said. “Unfortunately, whatever has been done so far has failed to produce timely results.“Details of the remediation plan were not released to the public, so it is difficult to understand why, considering the reported financial commitment, a tangible solution has yet to be found.”The Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) is responsible for the sculpture garden, and executive director Casuarina McKinney-Lambert warned of the devastating impact this pollution is having on living coral reefs, fish and other marine organisms in the area.Haley-Benjamin said: “We wholeheartedly support and second BREEF’s call for increased protection of the reef systems around western New Providence, which are critically important resources, ecologically and commercially speaking, and which have been under severe stress from industrial pollution for years.”The area is vital to the local dive tourism sector, she said, as well as for recreational and commercial fishermen, with the sculpture garden in particular attracting interest from avid divers around the world.Designed as a fusion of art, education, and marine conservation, the garden was created to provide a habitat for fish, corals and other marine organisms, divert snorkelers and divers away from natural reefs and thus providing space for restoration, and serve as an outdoor classroom for environmental education and citizen science.“Quite aside from the dire environmental consequences, the ongoing pollution is threatening tourism revenue and doing untold damage to the country’s reputation abroad,” Haley-Benjamin said. “STB is calling on the government to make this issue a priority and give it the attention it deserves.”According to Dr. Craig Dahlgren, a marine biologist and senior research scientist who studied coral reef ecology in The Bahamas and wider Caribbean for more than 20 years, pollution has already had a devastating effect on Clifton Bay.“In surveys of coral reefs around New Providence conducted in 2011, sites near Clifton were among the lowest in terms of live coral cover, and had seen some of the greatest declines in live coral from previous surveys of reefs off southwest New Providence conducted in 2009,” he said.At some sites, the researched showed this decline to have been as high as 43% in just two years.In addition to coastal pollution, increased temperatures and overfishing have also had an impact. However, Dahlgren said, the sites closest to likely pollution sources were among those with the lowest live coral cover.“It is clear that significant changes are happening to our coral reef resources,” Haley-Benjamin said. “It is imperative that we act now to prevent continued degradation.“We and other concerned environmental groups stand ready to assist the government in identifying the origins of the oil spills and enhancing remediation efforts to accelerate meaningful results.“To the extent that the $10 million plan announced in January may be working, it is clearly not working fast enough.” Related Items:clifton bay, oil pollution, Save The Bays Recommended for you Musical Legend KB’s Latest Save The Bays Release ‘Das What Real Bahamians Do’ Tackles the Silent Tough One, the PSA Environmentalist warns of a third possible Rubis leak Government ‘jumped the gun’ over Rubis leak risks Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Brenden Ross Named To Deans List At Norwich University

first_imgNORTHFIELD, VT — Brenden Mark Ross, of Wilmington, was named to the Dean’s List for the Fall 2018 semester at Norwich University.Full-time undergraduate students, who earned a semester grade point average of at least 3.0 and had no failures in the previous Fall or Spring semester are awarded Dean’s List honors.About Norwich UniversityNorwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates  traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning  programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees.Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of the nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC).(NOTE: The above announcement is from Norwich University.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington’s Halliday Named To Dean’s List At Norwich UniversityIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Regis CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 5 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At University Of MaineIn “Education”last_img read more

Dish and TMobile reach divestiture deal but DOJ still needs to sign

first_img Samsung, LG, Motorola: How soon can we expect 5G phones? 13 Photos 2:25 How fast is T-Mobile’s 5G network? We took it for a test… DIsh and T-Mobile reportedly have reached a deal to see Dish pick up assets divested as part of the T-Mobile/Sprint merger.  Josh Miller/CNET Dish Network may have saved T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint. According to CNBC, Dish and T-Mobile have reached a deal on the assets T-Mobile would be divesting as part of its planned $26.5 billion merger with Sprint. The deal, the report notes, is pending Department of Justice approval. The DOJ has been looking at Dish as a potential fourth carrier in the wake of the merger, an answer to concerns that the US cellular market would be less competitive with just AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile as national players. Last month, attorneys general from 13 states, plus the District of Columbia, filed or joined a multistate lawsuit to block the deal, arguing that competition will suffer if the US market shrinks from four major wireless carriers to three.In a second report, CNBC revealed some specifics of the deal. According to the cable network, Dish would get added wireless spectrum — the airwaves needed to broadcast cellular networks — and Boost Mobile, plus the ability to use T-Mobile and Sprint’s combined network for “about six or seven years.” CNBC says the companies could have a formal agreement next week. Dish has billions of dollars’ worth of its own spectrum to create a wireless network but has until March 2020 to utilize it or risk losing its license. The satellite provider has reportedly been hoping to gain an extension from the government as part of its negotiations to buy the divested assets. There could be a cost for buying the assets, however, beyond a sticker price. According to CNBC T-Mobile has capped any “strategic Dish investor” to a 5% investment, potentially limiting Dish’s ability to partner with a major technology company like Amazon or Google to help finance the building of its own wireless network.  T-Mobile did not immediately respond to a CNET request for comment. Dish declined to comment.  Rumors Dish Network Sprint T-Mobile Now playing: Watch this:center_img Comment Share your voice Tags Mobile 1last_img read more

Compromise To Undo Bathroom Bill Passes Key Hurdle

first_img Share “At its core, it’s a statewide prohibition on equality,” Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin told reporters, adding that consequences could fall on Cooper. A transgender man who works at the University of North Carolina, Joaquin Carcano, spoke against the deal during the Senate committee meeting. Carcano said the proposal replaces House Bill 2 with a “new form of violence” against LGBT people and is sacrificing “our lives and our safety for the sake of basketball.” The Republican-controlled legislature passed HB2 a year ago in response to a Charlotte ordinance that allowed transgender people to use restrooms aligned with their gender identity. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory immediately signed the bill, and it appeared to cost him re-election in November. HB2 supporters say ordinances like the one in Charlotte make it easy for sexual predators to enter public restrooms designated for the opposite sex. Opponents say that’s nonsense and the danger is imagined. Several potential compromises have failed over the past year, including one during a special session in December that collapsed amid partisan finger-pointing. GOP and Democratic legislators have been in a seemingly endless chase during the past several weeks to cobble together enough votes on various drafts of legislation. A compromise that would roll back North Carolina’s contentious “bathroom bill” cleared a key hurdle Thursday when senators approved the measure, but it may not go far enough to quell furor surrounding the law limiting LGBT protections. Gay and civil rights groups say the replacement bill isn’t a true repeal of the law and will continue to allow discrimination. And some social conservatives preferred to have House Bill 2 stay on the books. Republican Sen. Dan Bishop, a primary sponsor of HB2, denounced the new deal on the Senate floor. “This bill is at best a punt; at worst it is a betrayal of principle,” the Charlotte-area legislator said. The Senate voted 32-16 in favor of the bill, with nine of 15 Democrats among the yes votes. The House took up debate on the measure around noon. Both chambers are controlled by Republicans. Just hours after the deal was announced Wednesday night, a dozen gay rights activists gathered outside the Executive Mansion in Raleigh, where Gov. Roy Cooper hosted Democrats, urging them to support the plan. Cooper was narrowly elected with LGBT support on a platform that included repealing HB2. “It’s not a perfect deal, but it repeals House Bill 2 and begins to repair our reputation,” Cooper said. The announcement came as the NCAA said North Carolina sites won’t be considered for championship events from 2018 to 2022 “absent any change” in House Bill 2, which it views as discrimination. The NCAA said decisions would be made starting this week on events and announced in April. North Carolina cities, schools and other groups have offered more than 130 bids for such events. The NCAA already removed championship events from the state this year because of the law, which limits LGBT nondiscrimination protections and requires transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate. HB2 has prompted businesses to halt expansions and entertainers and sports organizations to cancel or move events, including the NBA All-Star game in Charlotte. An Associated Press analysis (http://apne.ws/2ocOSnu ) this week found that HB2 already will cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years. The new proposal would repeal HB2 and leave state legislators in charge of policy on public multi-stall restrooms. Local governments also couldn’t pass new nondiscrimination protections for workplaces, hotels and restaurants until December 2020. That temporary moratorium, according to GOP House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger, would allow time for pending federal litigation over transgender issues to play out. “Compromise requires give and take from all sides, and we are pleased this proposal fully protects bathroom safety and privacy,” Berger and Moore said in a statement. It’s not clear whether the NCAA would be satisfied by the changes. Gay rights activists blasted the proposal, saying those who back it aren’t allies of the LGBT community. They say only a complete repeal will do.last_img read more