Engineering Explained Busts Myths EVs Not Worse For Environment

first_imgNaysayers will never stop efforts to convince people that EVs are bad for the environment, but the truth is a different story.There are plenty of arguments that attempt to put electric cars in the dog house when in comes to their environmental friendliness claims. Manufacturing the batteries (and the vehicles) causes plenty of emissions. Electricity comes from fossil fuels, so the pollution source is still present, it’s just shifted. Mining for materials used to make batteries is dangerous and bad for the environment.Related Stories: Engineering Explained Dives Into EV Torque Versus Gas HP Source: Electric Vehicle News Electric Cars are Dirty! Not Really – Fully Charged The above arguments have been spewed for years, and if you don’t have advanced knowledge or understanding of the subject, they can come across as very believable. However, no matter how you slice it, EVs are cleaner than ICE cars. In addition, as time moves forward, they become exponentially cleaner, while many gas-powered cars are moving in the opposite direction.Take a close look at the video above and share it to help dispel the myths. One of the best ways to increase EV adoption is through education, and electric car owners need to be the number once advocates. This would be a great story to have on hand during upcoming holiday engagements to help convince your friends and family to switch to an EV.Please share your knowledge and insight in the comment section below.Video Description via Engineering Explained on YouTube:Are Electric Cars Worse For The Environment? Myth BustedAre Electric Cars Greener Than Gasoline Powered Cars? The Facts About Electric Cars & The Environment – Sponsored by FEElectric cars are touted as a solution for reducing emissions and improving the environmental impacts of transportation, but are electric cars actually any better for the environment than gasoline cars? This video looks to answer three main questions: 1) Doesn’t EV battery production cause a lot of emissions? 2) Don’t electric cars get their power from fossil fuels? 3) Isn’t lithium mining terrible for the environment? Tesla’s Efficiency Edge Speaks Volumes For Its Engineering Lead Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 9, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Door opens for Sotherton and Ennis as Kluft drops heptathlon

first_imgShare on Facebook Athletics Olympics 2008 Since you’re here… Share on Pinterest First published on Wed 19 Mar 2008 20.53 EDT Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Shares00 Michael Phillips The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share on Messenger Kelly Sotherton and Jessica Ennis yesterday became Britain’s best hopes for an athletics gold medal at this year’s Olympic Games when Sweden’s Carolina Kluft said she would not be defending her heptathlon title in Beijing. Kluft, who has not lost a multi-events competition for more than six years, has chosen to concentrate on the long jump and triple jump instead.”It’s risky, I know, but it just seems so right,” she said. “I understand that a lot of people will not understand the decision and will contest it but the motivation is not sufficiently there for the heptathlon.” … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Facebook Support The Guardiancenter_img Door opens for Sotherton and Ennis as Kluft drops heptathlon Share on LinkedIn Olympic Games Kelly Sotherton Jessica Ennis-Hill Wed 19 Mar 2008 20.53 EDT Share via Email Topics Share on Twitter Read more Sotherton finished third behind Kluft in the Games in Athens in 2004 and in last summer’s world championships in Osaka, where her British team-mate Ennis was only 41 points away in fourth place. But Sotherton was quick to stress her regret at now probably never having the chance to defeat Kluft over the seven disciplines on the Olympic stage.”I am disappointed Carolina is not going to be competing in the heptathlon in Beijing,” she said. “Although it leaves it wide open, it takes away my chance to finally beat her. I understand it adds to the pressure on me but my aim was to go out and win gold, so my goals and preparations won’t be changing in any way. Carolina is a sensational champion and I believe there will be a chance for us to meet again in the future.”By the time of the Olympics in London in 2012 Sotherton will be 35 and she plans to be competing in only one discipline, most likely the long jump, where she might even meet Kluft. But, with Paula Radcliffe, Britain’s marathon world record-holder, suffering a disruption to her preparation because of a toe injury, Ennis and Sotherton are increasingly prominent gold-medal favourites for Beijing.Kluft, 25, the triple world champion, has never lost a major championship heptathlon and the pressure will grow on Sotherton to make greater improvement in her weakest element – the javelin – which could prove even more valuable. As she said, the event is wide open.Lyudmila Blonska, the controversial Ukrainian who was suspended for two years for failing a drugs test, finished second in Osaka but this month in the World Indoor Championships in Valencia she was last in the pentathlon. Sotherton took silver, missing out on victory by 15 points to Belgium’s Tia Hellebaut, the European high jump champion, who is set to concentrate solely on that event in Beijing.Ennis, Britain’s Commonwealth Games bronze medallist behind the champion, Sotherton, said of Kluft’s absence: “I’m totally surprised because I’d had it in my head that she would be there in Beijing. It’s a good move for her to go into another event and try to achieve what she has done in heptathlon. I’m sure she will do well. It’s great news for everyone else in the heptathlon as well – it’ll be exciting to see how this might mix things up come the Olympics.”Kluft has spoken frequently this winter of her lack of hunger for the heptathlon, compounded by an injury which forced her out of Valencia. “I had a chat with myself and followed what my heart said,” she said. “I have always loved the heptathlon. Maybe I’ll try it again in a few years, but right now I don’t have the motivation necessary for competing at the top level.” Share via Email Athletics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Murrays global deal lets him brand it like Beckham

first_imgFirst published on Mon 5 Jan 2009 19.05 EST Share on WhatsApp Tennis Share on LinkedIn Mon 5 Jan 2009 19.05 EST Share on Twitter • Murray signs with Simon Fuller, the man behind Pop Idol• Decision part of a campaign to boost Murray’s international stature The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Murray’s global deal lets him brand it like Beckham Andy Murray … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Andy Murray Shares00 Share on Facebook Owen Gibson and Richard Jagocenter_img Reuse this content Read more Since you’re here… Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Support The Guardian Share via Email Share via Email Andy Murray may have started the season in fine form on the tennis court but he has also resolved that 2009 will be the year he makes a serious impression off it. The Scot’s decision to sign with 19 Entertainment, the company that fuelled the growth of Brand Beckham and propelled the Spice Girls to huge riches not once but twice, marks a new determination to compete on a international stage.According to industry insiders, that could mean trading in domestic sponsors such as Highland Spring and Fred Perry for global brands and a concerted campaign to elevate Murray’s stature not only in Europe and the US but in the sport’s frontier lands of Doha, Beijing and Dubai. Just as Murray, now No4 in the world, has prospered with his game since recruiting his own bespoke team, those close to him have turned to Simon Fuller, the man made rich by rolling out Pop Idol around the world, to try to repeat the trick with his branding.Murray and his mother Judy, who plays a key role in overseeing the careers of Andy and his brother Jamie (who has also signed with 19), have hand picked a small team of Fuller’s employees to work with them during what could be a pivotal year. The decision to jettison Ace Management, a boutique sports agency whose managing director, Patricio Apey, has personally looked after Murray’s affairs, for the global reach of 19 was based on a desire to exploit the boost in profile that will result from a grand slam victory or further progress up the rankings by the Britain No1.”I had been with Patricio for three years, maybe a little bit more. I did well with him, he did a good job. But like a lot of things they run their course and you want to move on,” said Murray yesterday. “I think the decision I have made is a good one. It’s a great opportunity. If I want to set up an exhibition or a charity or a school or an academy or whatever, I just think if you are with a bigger company these sort of things become easier.” Share on Pinterest Topics Share on Messenger 19 will take over Murray’s affairs from March, although that date could move forward if an agreement can be reached with Ace. Industry insiders are split on the wisdom of the move with some questioning whether Murray would not be better off with a more traditional sports agency. But Fuller’s elevated position in the entertainment industry on both sides of the Atlantic will help move Murray into rarified company. Already a key Los Angeles powerbroker by virtue of the fact that Pop Idol almost single-handedly saved Rupert Murdoch’s Fox network, Fuller’s stock has risen further since he sold 19 to US group CKX for £75m in 2005.The move to secure Murray could also signal a more concerted effort to move into sport by the company. Insiders say Fuller has a policy of only signing one key name in each sport and will only take on those he believes have the potential to become global stars. “For each Murray or Beckham, there are 30 or 40 who wouldn’t want or benefit from the 19 treatment,” said one.Another recent foray into sport by 19 was unsuccessful after a high-profile environmental project for Honda foundered and some observers saw it as a contributory factor to the team’s decision to pull out of formula one altogether. And aside from its success with Beckham, who was already a global star, 19’s other sporting work has been more low key. For the past year, for example, it has handled the affairs of Team England.Murray, though, will benefit from an alliance with Hollywood powerhouse Creative Artists which counts Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt and sports stars including Novak Djokovic and Beckham among its US clients.19 is following a familiar path. Over a protracted 18-month period Beckham split with SFX, the sports agency that had helped mastermind his ascent, ahead of his move to Real Madrid, and signed with Fuller. While critics initially sniffed at Fuller’s grandiose plans to build a global brand around Beckham and his wife Victoria that transcended music and sport, he had the last laugh.While no one in the sports marketing industry expects Murray to be given a slick overnight makeover – “David Beckham is a sex symbol, popular with people who don’t follow the sport and a global figure. Andy Murray is never going to be that,” points out Max Clifford – they detect signs that the once truculent teenager is maturing into a potentially marketable star.They believe younger sports fans can identify with him in a way that few other global sports stars can match, seeing him as less remote than his rivals and pointing to the popularity of his website. A priority will be to secure new deals with brands that can help take him to a larger audience without diluting his unaffected air.last_img read more

DraftKings Sues Texas AG Paxton FanDuel Settles

first_imgNot a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Username Lost your password? Online fantasy sports operator DraftKings sued Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton in Dallas County District Court Friday evening, seeking a court order to prevent Paxton from “forcing DraftKings out of business in Texas.”DraftKings lawsuit came only hours after Paxton announced the state had reached a settlement with the other major daily fantasy sports site, FanDuel . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Password Remember melast_img

Groundbreaking EU project to tackle overweight and obesity in young people

first_img Source:https://www.worldobesity.org/ Jun 26 2018A consortium of 14 international research and advocacy organizations meet in Oslo, Norway, today and tomorrow (27-28 June) to kick off a ground-breaking project to tackle overweight and obesity in young people. The initiative involves young people as a key component throughout the project, designing policies and advocating practices they believe will help improve adolescent health. Supported by the European Commission, the budget of over €9.5m will provide a program of activities for a five-year period 2018-2023.The project, titled CO-CREATE, will work with adolescents to create, inform and disseminate policies to tackle obesity among their peers. The project sees adolescence as a crucial age-group with increasing autonomy and soon to be the next generation of adults, parents and policymakers, and thus important agents for change. CO-CREATE sees youth involvement as an essential component to the development of policies which are aimed at them, and thus the project aims to involve and empower adolescents and youth organizations to foster a participatory process of identifying and formulating relevant policies, assessing the options with other private and public actors, promoting relevant policy actions and developing tools and strategies for implementation.Related StoriesNovel program in England’s third largest city helps reduce childhood obesityMaternal obesity may negatively affect children’s lung developmentResearchers propose new avenue in the search for anti-obesity drugsIn addition to the involvement of young people, another key element of CO-CREATE will be the use of a societal systems approach to understand how different societal factors, stakeholders and institutions associated with obesity interact at various levels, and the implications these have on policy and young people.CO-CREATE partner organizations include university research departments, national public health institutions and a number of civil society organizations concerned with health policies and youth well-being. The project will build on existing initiatives and platforms, and construct new opportunities and platforms for youth engagement in the issue and youth participation in democratic moves for advocacy and policy change.“Young people are not heard enough in developing the policies that affect them, and shaping the environments in which they live,” said project leader, Professor Knut-Inge Klepp of the Norwegian Institute for Public Health. “As researchers and advocacy organizations we should listen more. We can bring large-scale datasets and policy monitoring tools, but we need to listen more if we are to create new strategies, tools and programs for promoting sustainable and healthy behaviors,” he said.The CO-CREATE Project has received funding from the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 research budget, shared between 14 research groups in six European countries plus Australia, South Africa and the United States. The project will be completed in 2023.last_img read more

Researchers reveal why CRISPR gene editing sometimes fails to work

first_imgJul 11 2018Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to describe why CRISPR gene editing sometimes fails to work, and how the process can be made to be much more efficient.CRISPR is a gene-editing tool that allows scientists to cut out unwanted genes or genetic material from DNA, and sometimes add a desired sequence or genes. CRISPR uses an enzyme called Cas9 that acts like scissors to cut out unwanted DNA. Once cuts are made on either side of the DNA to be removed, the cell either initiates repair to glue the two ends of the DNA strand back together, or the cell dies.In a study published in the journal Molecular Cell, the researchers showed that when gene editing using CRISPR fails, which occurs about 15 percent of the time, it is often due to persistent binding of the Cas9 protein to the DNA at the cut site, which blocks the DNA repair enzymes from accessing the cut.Senior author Bradley Merrill, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics in the UIC College of Medicine, says that before now, researchers did not know why the process randomly failed.”We found that at sites where Cas9 was a ‘dud’ it stayed bound to the DNA strand and prevented the cell from initiating the repair process,” Merrill said. The stuck Cas9 is also unable to go on to make additional cuts in DNA, thus limiting the efficiency of CRISPR, he said.Merrill, UIC graduate student Ryan Clarke, and their colleagues also found that Cas9 was likely to be ineffective at sites in the genome where RNA polymerases -; enzymes involved in gene activity -; were not active. Further investigation revealed that guiding Cas9 to anneal to just one of the strands making up the DNA double helix promoted interaction between Cas9 and the RNA polymerase, helping to transform a “dud” Cas9 into an efficient genome editor.Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellCRISPR uncovers which gene fusions are critical for growth of cancer cellsHundreds of new anti-cancer drug targets identified using CRISPRSpecifically, they found that consistent strand selection for Cas9 during genome editing forced the RNA polymerases to collide with Cas9 in such a way that Cas9 was knocked off the DNA.”I was shocked that simply choosing one DNA strand over the other had such a powerful effect on genome editing,” said Clarke, the lead author of the paper. “Uncovering the mechanism behind this phenomenon helps us better understand how Cas9 interactions with the genome can cause some editing attempts to fail and that, when designing a genome editing experiment, we can use that understanding to our benefit.””This new understanding is important for those of us who need genome editing to work well in the lab and for making genome editing more efficient and safer in future clinical uses,” Merrill said.The study findings are also significant because, in the genome editing process, the interaction between Cas9 and the DNA strand is now known to be the “rate-limiting step,” said Merrill. This means that it is the slowest part of the process; therefore, changes at this stage have the most potential to impact the overall duration of genome editing.”If we can reduce the time that Cas9 interacts with the DNA strand, which we now know how to do with an RNA polymerase, we can use less of the enzyme and limit exposure,” Merrill said. “This means we have more potential to limit adverse effects or side effects, which is vital for future therapies that may impact human patients.”Source: https://today.uic.edu/biochemists-discover-cause-of-genome-editing-failures-with-hyped-crispr-systemlast_img read more

Disrupted transportation routes in nerve cells are main cause of Parkinsons disease

first_imgJul 26 2018’Traffic jams’ can also occur in the brain and they can be damaging. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have been able to confirm that this is the case. They have been able to prove that disrupted transportation routes in nerve cells are a significant cause of Parkinson’s disease.Nerve fibers give nerve cells their characteristic long shape. Measuring up to one meter in length, they form the contact points to other nerve cells. In order to carry out the important task of communicating with other nerve cells, the fine branches of these nerve fibers and their ends, called synapses, must be regularly supplied with energy from the cell body. If this energy supply is interrupted, the synapses are destroyed. Connections between nerve cells are then disrupted, which can lead to the cells dying off. This process is typical for the development of brain disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.Related StoriesPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaResearchers measure EEG-based brain responses for non-speech and speech sounds in childrenIt is unclear which mechanisms are responsible for the loss of nerve cells in Parkinson’s. Researchers at FAU led by Dr. Iryna Prots and Prof. Dr. Beate Winner from the Department of Stem Cell Biology in conjunction with researchers from the Department of Molecular Neurology (Janina Grosch, head: Prof. Dr. Jürgen Winkler) have now succeeded in demonstrating that a type of ‘traffic jam’ in the nerve cells could be the cause.The researchers discovered that the traffic jam is triggered by a protein called alpha-synuclein, which is also found in healthy nerve cells. In abnormal nerve cells, the protein forms deposits, or even lumps, leading to a delay, disrupting the energy supply of the nerve fibers and, ultimately, damaging the synapses.The researchers were also able to demonstrate this mechanism in cell cultures taken from patients with Parkinson’s. A small skin sample was taken from affected patients. These skin cells were then converted into stem cells, which can be developed into any type of cell, and in this case, into nerve cells.In initial trials, the researchers succeeded in suppressing the formation of lumps of alpha-synuclein, thus improving the transportation of information in the nerve fibers. However, the substance they used has not yet passed clinical trials. Nevertheless, the lead author of the study, Dr. Iryna Prots, says ‘Our findings mean we can improve our understanding of the mechanisms that cause Parkinson’s and push forward new strategies for treatment during the progression of the disease.’ Source:https://www.fau.eu/2018/07/25/news/research/disrupted-transport-routes-in-nerve-cells-are-a-cause-of-parkinsons/last_img read more

Electrical stimulation of the brain may help treat symptoms of neurodegenerative ataxias

first_imgAug 23 2018Electrical stimulation of the brain and spinal cord may help treat the symptoms of rare movement disorders called neurodegenerative ataxias, according to a study published in the August 22, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. There are several types of these disorders, which can be hereditary or occur randomly, including spinocerebellar ataxia, multiple system atrophy and Friedreich’s ataxia. Symptoms of ataxias include a lack of coordination that can cause clumsy movements of arms and legs, problems with speech clarity, and sometimes problems with vision, thinking and memory abilities.The electrical stimulation is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive therapy that delivers a small electrical current through electrodes placed on the head and along the spine.”These diseases can be devastating, and no effective treatments are currently available for most of these disorders, so there is great interest in finding new treatments to help reduce symptoms,” said study author Barbara Borroni, MD, of the University of Brescia in Brescia, Italy.The study involved 20 people with several types of ataxias that affected the cerebellar area of the brain, the part of the brain that helps coordinate movement. They were an average age of 55 and had the disease for an average of 13 years. The participants were divided into two groups. One group received electrical stimulation of the brain and spinal cord five days a week for two weeks while the other group received a sham stimulation where the electrodes were placed on the participant, but the electric current was powered down after five seconds.The participants were evaluated before the study began and again at two weeks, one month and three months after the treatment on overall tests of ataxia, tests of hand and arm dexterity and how fast they could walk, as well as tests of how their brains were responding to the treatment. Then the participants waited during a three-month “wash-out” period before receiving the opposite treatment and taking the tests again.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaWhen the participants received the stimulation treatment, they improved in every test, while when they received the sham stimulation, they showed no improvement on any test. For example, on the test of how fast participants could walk eight meters (about 26 feet), participants took an average of 9.4 seconds before the study started. One month after receiving the stimulation, they took an average of 7.8 seconds. After the sham stimulation, the participants had no changes in their times to complete the test.On a test of hand and arm coordination, participants took an average of 53 seconds to place and remove pegs from a peg board before the study started. One month after receiving the stimulation, participants took an average of 47 seconds to complete the test, while after the sham stimulation they had no change in their speed.Borroni noted that the results lasted for at least three months for participants.”The people who had milder symptoms of their disease showed the greatest improvement in their test scores, suggesting that this stimulation should be given at an early stage of the disease to be more effective,” Borroni said.A limitation of the study was the small number of participants and that they had various types of neurodegenerative ataxias, so the results may not be applicable to all people with these disorders. Source:https://www.aan.com/PressRoom/Home/PressRelease/1667last_img read more

Newly discovered target may prevent progression of liver injury to cancer

first_imgAug 27 2018Problems like obesity and alcoholism appear to chronically trigger in the liver a receptor known to amplify inflammation in response to invaders like bacteria, scientists report.The relentless, increased activity of TREM-1 in turn accelerates injury and scarring of the liver, a first step toward cirrhosis and liver cancer, says Dr. Anatolij Horuzsko, reproductive immunologist in the Georgia Cancer Center and Department of Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.TREM-1, or triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, is known to help turn up inflammation short-term to help us deal with external invaders. It has increased activity immediately after an injury as well, when increased inflammation, damage cleanup and collagen production aid healing.But Georgia Cancer Center scientists report in the Journal of Clinical Investigation the first evidence that when activated by chronic offending agents, like obesity and hepatitis, TREM-1 instead contributes to a destructive level of inflammation that results in liver damage and possibly cancer.The unhealthy transformation can occur in five to 50 years, depending on factors like the level of insult, and may be largely reversible up to the point of cirrhosis, if the offending agent is stopped, and the liver’s natural ability to regenerate takes over.Horuzsko and his colleagues think TREM-1 could one day be another point of intervention, possibly with a drug that could return TREM-1 activation to normal levels on resident, garbage-eating, watchdog immune cells called Kupffer cells.”Right now we have treatment for hepatitis C, for example, which is very efficient, if we treat it before too much damage is done. But we don’t have treatment for alcohol- or obesity-related damage,” Horuzsko says.They already are doing experiments with a drug that, because of its structure, should enable tamping down of TREM-1, but long-term goals include a drug that would target this receptor on Kupffer cells.It’s known that inflammation is a key process in the thickening and scarring of the liver called fibrosis, and that tamping down inflammation can help prevent fibrosis progression. But just how inflammation and fibrosis happen at the cellular and molecular level is largely unknown, say Horuzsko, the study’s corresponding author.Their work in both animal models and human tissue indicate TREM-1 is essential to both.In the liver, TREM-1 is found primarily on Kupffer cells, the liver’s resident macrophages, as well as monocytes, a type of white blood cell that can also become garbage-eating macrophages.TREM-1’s expression is limited in a healthy human liver but its activation goes up short-term following an insult, like a laceration.To look at what happens in the face of a chronic problem, the scientists created a model of chronic liver disease – like obesity or high alcohol consumption might – using carbon tetrachloride, a poisonous solvent found in oils, varnishes and resin. They found TREM-1 activation went up and stayed up on a larger number of Kupffer cells in the liver as well as other immune cells circulating in the body.When they deleted TREM-1 from the model, it reduced inflammation, injury and subsequent fibrosis. When they gave TREM-1 back to the mice, inflammation and related damage came back with a vengeance, leading them to dub TREM-1 the main target that drives fibrogenesis.They found TREM-1 even recruits other pro-inflammatory cells from the bone marrow to the liver, many of which could become macrophages as well, which further multiplies the inflammation, liver cell damage and death.”This creates a loop,” says Horuzsko, of increased activity on many fronts. “This creates chronic inflammation – with no bacterium or virus involved – which is important to the development of liver disease.”As liver cells die in the face of chronic inflammation, they release their innards, called damage associated molecular patterns, or DAMPs, when they get outside the cells. DAMPs further activate TREM-1 on the macrophages and the damaging momentum builds, he says.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsThat’s where collagen and fibrosis set in. Stellate cells in the liver are normally quiescent and mainly store vitamin A. When TREM-1 gets activated on the macrophages, it also activates the macrophages themselves which, in turn, activate stellate cells.Stellate cells literally change their shape, release vitamin A and start to make collagen. Collagen is a component of connective tissue that typically helps hold tissues and blood vessels together and aids wound healing. The liver already has some collagen, but in this scenario too much gets deposited and liver function suffers.”Efficiency goes down and it causes additional damage to liver cells that already have been damaged by something like hepatitis or obesity,” Horuzsko says. The liver of a patient with cirrhosis, for example, is overrun with collagen, he notes.Blood levels of the enzymes alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, and aspartate aminotransferase, or AST, are indicators of liver injury and both went up and remained high in their models. However, in mice where TREM-1 was knocked out, rates went up only short- term before returning to pre-injury levels, another indicator of TREM-1’s role in persistent inflammation and resulting damage, Horuzsko says.They also found that while mice with and without TREM-1 both recruited additional immune cells, such as more macrophages and monocytes, from their bone marrow immediately after the injury, 72 hours later the levels were much higher both in the blood and livers of the mice that also still had TREM-1.To look further at the role of Kupffer cells when TREM-1 is out of the picture, they first removed the cells from both mice models, then gave Kupffer cells that contained TREM-1 back to both, and both were able to cause localized damage and recruit immune cells from the marrow to further bolster inflammation. But when they put TREM-1-deficient Kupffer cells back in normal mice, the exaggerated inflammation and liver damage did not happen.Likewise, they found markedly increased infiltration of TREM-1 expressing cells in patients with liver fibrosis.”TREM-1 is a molecule that can be very dangerous and is normally very controlled in the body,” Horuzsko says. In fact, one of the diagnostic criteria for body-wide infection, or sepsis, is the level of TREM-1 protein in the fluid portion of a patient’s blood. And, in hepatitis B related liver cancer in humans, high levels of TREM-1 expression on stellate cells is considered an indicator of poor prognosis.”The balance in our body is very, very tightly regulated and important. Alcohol, obesity, hepatitis viruses all change the balance,” Horuzsko says.The scientists suspect their findings of TREM-1 gone wild will hold true in other organs including the lungs, heart and kidneys, which also have TREM-1 on their macrophages.Liver cancer rates have risen dramatically in the United States, 43 percent in men and 40 percent in women, from 2000-16, according to a report released this summer by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In May 2017, the CDC reported that newly reported cases of hepatitis C tripled between 2010-15 and the American Cancer Society says liver cancer rose from ninth to the sixth leading cause of cancer death from 2000-16.The most common causes of liver cancer include infection with the hepatitis B or C virus, heavy alcohol use, obesity and diabetes, according to the CDC.The liver is part of the gastrointestinal tract and filters blood coming from the GI tract before the blood circulates to the rest of the body. Its myriad of functions include secreting bile, which helps us absorb fats and eliminate waste; producing cholesterol, triglycerides and blood clotting factors; and detoxifying chemicals. The liver is the heaviest solid organ in the body and sits on the right sight of the body behind the lower ribs. Source:https://www.augusta.edu/mcg/last_img read more

Monkey deaths prompt probe of Harvard primate facility

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Agriculture has launched an investigation into Harvard University’s New England Primate Research Center after several suspicious deaths at the Southborough, Massachusetts, facility. The inquiry coincides with a series of articles published by The Boston Globe, which has uncovered a number of potential animal welfare violations at the center, including a dozen dehydrated squirrel monkeys found dead in their cages or euthanized because of poor health between 1999 and 2011. In several cases it appears that the animals were not given water or were unable to drink due to malfunctioning water lines. In one incident, a monkey’s tooth caught in her jacket, preventing her from drinking. Some of these animals were the subject of a 2014 Veterinary Pathology paper on the impact of dehydration on lab animals. The journal says it is now investigating this study. The primate center is set to close at the end of next month, though—according to the Globe—the university blames finances, not animal care problems.last_img read more

Video Springloaded jaws rocket ants to safety

first_imgThe spring-loaded mouth of the trap-jaw ant (genus Odontomachus) is one of the fastest moving body parts in all the animal kingdom. The insects use them to protect their nests, spreading their mandibles apart and then snapping them together at speeds up to 230 km per hour and hurling invading species into the air. Now, researchers report that the ants can also use their jaws to hurl themselves into the air to escape predators, giving them a significantly better chance for survival. The team placed single trap-jaw ants into plastic cups filled with 4 cm of sand and a 1-cm-long burrowing insect with large jaws—known as an antlion—at the bottom. During their larval stage, the antlions burrow in fine sand, forming a pit above them. The steep and unstable walls of the pit can prove challenging to climb for unfortunate ants who venture too close—a problem compounded by the fact that the antlion will throw sand at their prey before pulling them beneath the surface. As seen in the video above, many ants did execute successful jumps by striking their jaws against the ground and blasting themselves into the air before being captured by the antlions. Out of 117 trials, the trap-jaw ants jumped their way to safety about 15% of the time and doubled their odds of survival by doing so, the team reports today in PLOS ONE. Not all jumps resulted in escape; some propelled the ant farther down the pit to their demise. For the ants, it seems, the best defense started out as a good offense.(Video credit: Larabee FJ, Suarez AV (2015) Mandible-Powered Escape Jumps in Trap-Jaw Ants Increase Survival Rates during Predator-Prey Encounters. PLOS ONE 10(5): e0124871)last_img read more

Majority of Americans were not exposed to fake news in 2016 US

first_img Email To investigate the spread of misinformation on social media, David Lazer, a political scientist at Northeastern University in Boston, and his colleagues examined tweets from 16,442 registered voters who also had Twitter accounts during the 2016 election. The demographics of the sample matched those of a 2016 Pew Research Center survey representative of U.S. voters who use Twitter, the researchers found.Then the authors created a list of fake news sources by identifying media outlets that present content with the appearance of journalism but repeatedly publish misinformation without correcting or retracting it. One of the most popular sources of misinformation identified by the study is a site called “The Gateway Pundit,” which published false headlines including: “Anti-Trump Protesters Bused Into Austin, Chicago” and “Did a Woman Say the Washington Post Offered Her $1,000 to Accuse Roy Moore of Sexual Abuse?”“If a site is repeatedly publishing inaccurate information and not correcting it, accurate news reporting is not really its goal,” Lazer says.Just 0.1% of the more than 16,000 users shared more than 80% of the fake news generated by such sites, and 80% of that fake news appeared in the feeds of only 1.1% of users, Lazer and his colleagues report today in Science. The team also found that older, more politically conservative Twitter users were more likely to view and spread misinformation.The research comes on the heels of another paper that reached similar conclusions about the spread of fake news on Facebook. That study’s lead author, Joshua Tucker, a political scientist at New York University in New York City, says that taken together the two studies suggest the majority of Americans are not sharing fake news or being exposed to it on social media. “[They] cut against the dominant narrative that fake news was everywhere on social media in 2016,” Tucker says.Still, he says, even small amounts of fake news could have an impact on the political process, and further research is needed to determine just what that impact is.Benkler adds that the findings might not apply to other countries, which have their own distinct media ecosystems. “What’s true for the U.S. may not hold in Brazil or the Philippines,” he says. “We need to extend this kind of work to the rest of the world, because this is a global problem.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Majority of Americans were not exposed to ‘fake news’ in 2016 U.S. election, Twitter study suggests Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Alex FoxJan. 24, 2019 , 2:10 PM In the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, a website calling itself “WTO5 News” posted the headline “Pope Francis shocks world, endorses Donald Trump for president.” Pope Francis never made such an endorsement, but that didn’t stop the story from being shared, liked, or commented on nearly 1 million times on social media. Another site, the “Denver Guardian,” posted a story titled “FBI agent suspected in Hillary email leaks found dead in apparent murder suicide” the day before the election. Social media users engaged in some way with that story more than half a million times.After the election, many experts worried the prevalence of such “fake news” on social networks such as Facebook and Twitter influenced the result. Now, a study of more than 16,000 Twitter users finds just a tiny fraction spread and saw the majority of misinformation, and that they were typically older and politically conservative. The authors say fake news may have been less pervasive on social media during the election than commonly assumed.“If fake news on social media undercuts the public’s ability to tell apart truth and fiction, then we need to do something about it,” says Yochai Benkler, a law professor and social scientist at Harvard University who was not involved in the study. “But it’s critical that we correctly diagnose the problem.” SÉBASTIEN THIBAULT last_img read more

Sudanese geneticist released from prison after revolution Im very optimistic

first_imgMuntaser Ibrahim says he was “really moved by the extent of international solidarity from the scientific community” during his imprisonment. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email On 11 April, Sudan’s despotic ruler of 3 decades Omar al-Bashir was deposed by the country’s military. The momentous move was precipitated by months of crippling public protests over deteriorating living conditions in the North African country. Although Sudan’s political future remains in limbo, with the military facing mounting calls to hasten a handover to civil rule, many Sudanese remain hopeful of a brighter future.On the same day that al-Bashir was ousted, the country’s security services released political prisoners arrested during the protests. Among them was geneticist Muntaser Ibrahim, who had by then spent 50 days behind bars after he and his academic colleagues had drawn up a document, signed by many other staff at the University of Khartoum, that contained suggestions for regime change.Science spoke to Ibrahim about his imprisonment, his release, and the future of science in Sudan. This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Linda NordlingApr. 29, 2019 , 5:05 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Gamal Osman Sudanese geneticist released from prison after revolution: ‘I’m very optimistic’ Q: Tell us about your arrest.A: There were actually several this year. The first time, I was sitting with colleagues discussing the memorandum for regime change we were preparing to deliver to the government. We were released the same day. The second time was during a protest at a University of Khartoum staff club. They arrested 25 of us and, again, released us at the end of the day. Usually, during those arrests, they are harsh with the young people, but they respect us gray hairs a bit more.The third and last took place in the center of Khartoum. It was during a political rally for the coalition asking for leadership change, which were happening three times a week. I had been asked to represent university staff, so I went. Even before anything started there were hundreds of security forces all around. They asked us to come with them.Q: Were you always politically active? A: I was active as a student, but since starting a research job I didn’t have the time! But in the last year or so I decided to take action. Things were dire, and everything was deteriorating. That’s when we started working on the memorandum for change from university staff. But no, I never thought I’d be a prisoner.Q: During your 6 weeks in prison, were you ever charged with anything?A: No, never. Freedom of gathering is guaranteed by Sudan’s constitution. I was only interrogated once. I believe my detention was directly related to the fact that more than 700 faculty members of the University of Khartoum signed a proposition for a peaceful transfer of power.Q: Did you know what was going on outside the prison? A: We were able to follow what was happening in the streets. We were usually let out of our cells for an hour or so. During the last 2 days they didn’t let us out at all, not even for an hour. But a prisoner would go out for medical treatment and get news, and when he came back he whispered it to us. We heard that people were in the streets in the hundreds of thousands. Our morale was getting higher.Q: How did you find out you were going to be released?A: They just came in the morning with instructions that we were going home. They just let us out. Outside the prison, people were waiting for us. They carried us on their shoulders. It was an amazing experience.Q: What’s happening now? Are the universities back up and running?A: Nothing is running. We still don’t have a civilian government. The military that took over are dragging their feet a bit. There is no lab work, and the country is still in a standstill. Students are still sitting in the yards.Q: And you, what are you doing? A: Since my release, I have been longing for my cell and the relaxation! [Laughs] We, the university staff, are still active in trying to reach a settlement to the political crisis. The university, historically, is a respected institution. I’m also busy finishing a book that I’ve written with Charles Rotimi [of the U.S. National Institutes of Health] about the genetics of African populations. I have had time to download the final manuscript and the proofs, and I hope it will be out soon.Q: How do you feel about the future of science in Sudan? A: I’m very optimistic about this revolution. We are smelling change. It will be good for science. Science needs independent universities, it needs freedom of thought. And scientists, like anybody else, need to take part in these turning points in history. It’s our duty.Q: Do you have a message to the people who called for your release?A: I was really moved by the extent of international solidarity from the scientific community. I didn’t see it as solidarity with myself, but with the peaceful protests. I took it as an indication of appreciation of what the Sudanese people have done. I hope we can get back to a normal life.last_img read more

Library and Information Service staff trained to improve service

first_imgShareTweetSharePinRaymond (l) and ToussaintChief Librarian Vernanda Raymond has described this year’s Library Week as “a great week! well-received by the public.”The Dominica Library and Information Service observed Library week from Monday 13th May to Friday 18th May 2019 with a focus on the sub theme, “ The Law and Public Records.”  Throughout the week, staff of the Public Documentation Centre and Archives engaged the public with information about the centre’s function and purpose.Staff of the centre attended a workshop on Friday which, it is expected, will enhance their skills on researching legal documents such as the laws of Dominica.“This will help to build staff capacity, how to search the law books and improve delivery of service to the public,” Raymond stated.An exposition entitled “Info- Splosion” was also held on Friday downstairs government headquarters where the library and other partners such as Solid Waste Management and Waitikubuli Writers Club, showcased their products and services.Indexer Assistant Sam Toussaint encouraged  the public to utilize their online services.“Presently, there are 14 online magazines such as Essence, Ebony and Time , a research database and home improvement reference centre,” Toussaint told DNO. He said that the home improvement research centre is very useful for property owners as Dominicans rebuild after the hurricane because it give very valuable information with “complete instructions”.Chief Librarian Raymond and her staff say they are looking forward to the opening of the Portsmouth and Grand Bay branches of the library and more particularly, to a new state of the art library in the very near future.The Roseau Public Library was badly damaged by Hurricane Maria in 2017. Many of the reading books were lost. However, the valuable documents were not lost as they are housed in a more secure location in Roseau. Flow Dominica has pledged US$200,000 towards the rebuilding of a new Library.last_img read more

New members added to Holbrook Chamber of Commerce board

first_img By China Cassidy         Holbrook Chamber of Commerce met on June 25 in the Route 66 Conference Room at the Historic County Courthouse.  The names of the new board members were announced, which included TaraSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad New members added to Holbrook Chamber of Commerce board July 3, 2019last_img

Cabinet nod to Bill to constitute new commission to replace MCI

first_img Implant Files: New licensing terms for medical devices, govt looks to Singapore Students learning science of medicine but not the art of healing: Major General Madhuri Kanitkar The CCEA also approved construction of a new 81.7 km railway line between Sahjanwa and Dohrighat in Uttar Pradesh at a cost of Rs 1319.75 crore; the doubling of the 142.97 km line New Bongaingaon to Agthori in Assam at a cost of Rs 2042.51 crore; and construction of a third line between Allahabad and Mughalsarai (150 km) for Rs 2649.44 crore. The work on these railway lines will produce 90 to 100 lakh mandays of work, Railway Minister Piyush Goyal said during the Cabinet briefing.The other Bills to get the cabinet’s nod on Wednesday include Dam Safety Bill to establish a National Dam Safety Authority as a regulator for 5600 dams in the country. The Bill has provisions for surveillance, inspection and repair of the dams and to set up standardised dam safety procedures across the country. A Companies (Amendment) Bill to replace an ordinance was also approved.The cabinet also decided that the new National Institutes of Design set up in Kurukshetra, Jorhat, Bhopal and Amaravati will be given status of Institutes of National Importance after amending the NID Act. A Bill to repeal 58 obsolete laws also got the Cabinet’s approval. Parliament Monsoon Session, harsh vardhan, National Medical Commission, NMC Bill, Lok Sabha, Medical Council Amendment Bill, Indian express Union ministers Prakash Javadekar and Piyush Goyal during a Cabinet briefing, in New Delhi on Wednesday. (PTI)The Union Cabinet on Wednesday approved the National Medical Commission Bill which provides for the constitution of National Medical Commission that will replace the Medical Council of India as the apex medical education regulator. The Bill allows for just one medical entrance test across the country, a single exit exam (the final MBBS exam) that will work as a licentiate examination, a screening test for foreign medical graduates and entrance test for admission to postgraduate programmes. Under the Bill, the fees and charges of 50 per cent of the total seats in private medical colleges and deemed universities will regulated. Advertising Advertising By Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 18, 2019 1:28:41 am The Bill proposes that NEET and common counselling will be applicable to all medical educational institutions, including AIIMS. The NMC Bill had been introduced in Lok Sabha some years ago when the provision of a standalone exit examination and the proposal for a bridge course that would allow Ayush doctors to practice allopathy had faced opposition. The Bill was sent to the standing committee after which the exit examination was changed to the final MBBS examination and the bridge course provision was dropped altogether.The proposed National Medical Commission will replace the Medical Council of India, which has been mired in corruption charges for years. The Parliament recently passed a Bill to replace the ordinance for a Board of Governors to supercede the MCI. The NMC will have four autonomous boards for undergraduate education, postgraduate education, medical assessment and rating, and ethics and registration.The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA) has also approved construction a 2880-MW Dibang Multipurpose Project in Arunachal Pradesh at the cost of Rs 1600 crore. Once completed, it will be the country’s highest dam at 278 m and also the largest hydroelectric project. Related News Undergraduate medical students to study ethics, communication from 2019-20 Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Out in the cold Sidhu says have quit Punjab ministry

first_img Sidhu’s quit letter raises hopes of MLAs eyeing Punjab cabinet berth Sources close to Sidhu said he was in the process of vacating his official residence and that he would now be based in Patiala, Amarinder’s hometown. Though Sidhu also belongs to Patiala, he had shifted base to Amritsar after being elected as Amritsar MP on a BJP ticket.Sidhu had protested against the withdrawal of the Local Bodies and Tourism and Culture Departments from him as Amarinder had hinted that non-performance was the reason behind the move. The CM had stated that the Congress could not do well in cities in Punjab in the Lok Sabha elections as the minister in-charge had failed to perform in urban local bodies. Sidhu had in turn released his report card and argued that the Congress did well in all the major cities. After that, he had gone incommunicado and met Rahul in Delhi.The animosity between Amarinder and Sidhu goes back to before he joined the Congress, with the CM making clear his opposition to the former cricketer being inducted. While Amarinder continued to sideline Sidhu in the state government, the latter’s star remained ascendant due to his proximity to the high command.Amarinder had also taken on Sidhu publicly for participating in the oath-taking ceremony of Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan, and greeting Pakistan Army chief Qamar Javed Bajwa with a warm hug there. Sidhu, in turn, had stolen a march by coming back with an assurance from Pakistan on opening of the Kartarpur Corridor.The announcement of his resignation ironically came on the day India and Pakistan announced a breakthrough on the corridor. Related News 21 Comment(s) After remaining incommunicado and in a self-imposed political exile for over a month, ever since Amarinder stripped him of his Local Bodies and Tourism and Culture portfolios, Sidhu Sunday tweeted his resignation letter, dated June 10 and addressed to “the AICC president”. Sidhu had met Congress leader Rahul Gandhi that day.Assigned Power and New & Renewable Energy portfolio in a reshuffle, Sidhu had not assumed charge. His resignation announcement came after a wait of over a month for the Congress high command to intervene. However, it is unclear where the resignation stands as, under the rules, a minister has to mark the same to the CM. If Sidhu doesn’t want to do his job, there’s nothing I can do about it: Amarinder Successor Mohindra backs CM’s ‘non-performer’ tag for Sidhu center_img Advertising ExplainedMove ends speculation, shows Captain is in commandThe cricketer-turned-politician Navjot Singh Sidhu’s decision to make public his June 10 resignation from the Cabinet not only brings to an end months of speculation about his future in the ministry, but also proves that Chief Minister Capt Amarinder Singh is clearly in command. His detractors can no longer hope to expect the high command to meddle in the state affairs. The Chief Minister, who had successfully bucked the BJP wave in the country, calls the shots.As the Chief Minister’s Office made it clear Sunday that Amarinder had not received any communication from Sidhu regarding this, he issued a second tweet that he would do so soon. Navjot Singh Sidhu resigns from Punjab Cabinet Both the CM and Navjot Singh Sidhu also got involved in a war of words over the latter’s visit to Pakistan.Amid his ongoing feud with Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh, cricketer-turned-politician Navjot Singh Sidhu announced his resignation from the state Cabinet on Sunday. Advertising Written by Kanchan Vasdev | Chandigarh | Updated: July 15, 2019 1:24:08 amlast_img read more

Aspirin shown to prevent the spread of cancer

first_imgPatients with cancer should be given the evidence now available and be helped to make their own judgement of the balance between the risks and the benefits of daily low dose.Evidence from further studies is urgently required, and patients should be strongly encouraged to participate in appropriate research studies. All patients should consult their GP before starting new medication.”Professor Peter Elwood, Cardiff University One of the researchers, Gregory Leonard an Irish doctor said that cancer research deals with “latest methods” which are usually “relatively expensive.”This study shows that “inexpensive generic medicines” are available as alternatives to slow the cancer progression or stop its growth.“The results of this study can have a huge impact on the global cancer burden, especially given the rising incidence of cancer in countries with lower levels of income,” he said.A follow-up study called Add-Aspirin, is now being planned, which will examine the efficacy of aspirin as a treatment for other cancers.An estimated 11,000 participants from UK, Ireland and India will take part in this study. All of these patients will take aspirin daily for five years while they are still in the early stages of breast cancer, stomach, esophagus, or prostate cancer.These patients are to be followed up for the next few years in order to see the effect of aspirin on recurrent rates and whether there are any side effects of taking the drug so often. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDOct 1 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)New research has demonstrated a role for Aspirin in the treatment of cancer. The study has been published in the latest issue of the journal Plos One Medicine.Image Credit: Zadorozhnyi Viktor / ShutterstockThe study was led by Professor Peter Elwood of Cardiff University who, along with his team noted that low-dose aspirin that is useful in patients with heart disease and stroke can play a role in cancer treatment.There have been studies that have shown that low dose aspirin can help prevent cancers.Now, researchers have revealed that low-dose aspirin can also aid as an additional treatment of cancer.The study was a systematic review (meta-analysis) of several studies. The researchers looked at survival outcomes of 120,000 patients with cancer on low dose aspirin therapy and compared them to 400,000 patients who were not prescribed aspirin.Both sets of patients when followed up revealed that those on aspirin had a 20 to 30 percent longer survival than those without aspirin.Aspirin users were also less likely to experience metastasis compared to those who do not take aspirin.Among the several studies that were included in this analysis, a colon cancer study revealed that a non-diabetic man or woman of around 65 years age and on aspirin regularly would have similar outcome and survival rates as a person who does not take aspirin aged 5 and 4 years younger, respectively.Aspirin seems to play an important therapeutic role among patients with bowel cancer and most of the studies included in this analysis looked at bowel cancer.Other cancers studied included patients with prostate and breast cancer.center_img Sources:Systematic review update of observational studies further supports aspirin role in cancer treatment: Time to share evidence and decision-making with patients?Cardiff University Press Releaselast_img read more

Galaxy S8 S8 Dazzle in Samsungs Comeback Launch

first_imgSamsung on Wednesday launched the Galaxy S8 and S8+, its next generation of smartphones. They feature major improvements in design and security processing power, as well as new digital assistant technology that may challenge the best devices on the market.The Galaxy S8 and S8+ are available with 5.8 inch and 6.2 inch screens respectively. Both sport an infinity display using Corning Gorilla Glass, and a bezel-less design that provides a wider viewing area and more immersive experience than traditional smartphones.The phones offer the industry’s first 10nm processor, which allows for greater speed and efficiency when multitasking, according to Samsung. Both models have an 8-MP front-facing camera with F1.7 smart autofocus and a 12-MP dual pixel rear camera.They are the first devices to be certified as Mobile HDR Premium by the UHD Alliance, which means viewers can watch TV and movies in vibrant color.Security features, courtesy of Samsung Knox, offer defense-level protection that includes biometric authentication with iris and fingerprint scanning and facial recognition. The Galaxy S8 and S8+ feature Samsung’s new digital assistant technology, called “Bixby,” which extends artificial intelligence capabilities to touch, vision and text commands. It features contextual awareness, so the device can recognize a local landmark, for example, and recommend nearby restaurants.”Bixby understands context. It knows what is happening on your screen,” Siriam Thodia, senior director of intelligence and IoT, told attendees at the launch event. David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times. Click Image to Enlarge Solid Receptioncenter_img “The Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ will be very well received, and it will solidify Samsung’s leadership in smartphones,” said Werner Goertz, research director for personal technologies innovation at Gartner.That said, none of the hardware or feature sets announced at the event are “revolutionary,” he told TechNewsWorld. The infinity display, which increases the viewable display to 83 percent, is a good and competitive addition — but LG announced the same feature for its G6 at the Mobile World Congress.In terms of recovering from the Galaxy Note recall, Samsung has learned to “directly, openly and proactively” address the loss of trust it caused, Goertz said.The S8 could be an “instant classic,” said Jitesh Ubrani, senior research analyst for worldwide mobile device trackers at IDC.Samsung has gone “above and beyond” in terms of design, he told TechNewsWorld.The Samsung Galaxy 8 and 8+ phones will be available starting April 21. They will come in five colors: Midnight Black, Orchid Gray, Arctic Silver, Coral Blue and Maple Gold. Bixby voice commands work with several native Samsung apps — ranging from contacts, camera and gallery to settings and messages. It works with some other Samsung and third-party apps as well.The Galaxy S8 and S8+ feature several interactive technologies, expanding the range of features throughout the Samsung ecosystem. The phones unlock the company’s new Gear VR with Controller, allowing single-handed navigation with Oculus devices. They also connect to the new Gear 360, which allows the creation of 4K 360-degree video and 15K photos.The phones work with Samsung Connect, which allows them to control IoT-enabled devices using three-step configuration. Samsung DeX allows the phones to provide a secure, desktop-like computing experience. Siri Killerlast_img read more